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dc.contributor.advisorBeeson, Pélagie M.en
dc.contributor.authorGluck, Leah Sara
dc.creatorGluck, Leah Saraen
dc.date.accessioned2017-07-27T21:57:39Z
dc.date.available2017-07-27T21:57:39Z
dc.date.issued2017
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/624994
dc.description.abstractPrimary Progressive Aphasia (PPA) is a slow-onset language disorder associated with cortical atrophy affecting critical language regions of the brain. There are three recognized variants of PPA, and they have been characterized on the basis of spoken language comprehension and production, as well as the location of cortical atrophy. Although written language is also impaired in PPA, the research in this area is limited, especially at the text level. The aim of this paper was to characterize the written narrative language samples of three individuals, each diagnosed with a different variant of PPA. Because PPA differentially degrades underlying cognitive processes fundamental to language performance (i.e., semantics, phonology, syntax, and orthography), we predicted that written language profiles would vary accordingly. Damage to phonological processing would be associated with a decline in the grammatical accuracy of sentences. Written narratives were compared to spoken narratives, and samples were analyzed for each variant at two points in time, to understand the progression of decline of written language. We found that written narratives had fewer words, but greater proportion of content. Overall, written narratives degraded phonological skills were, in fact, associated with the production of sentences that were not well-formed. These data support further investigation of narrative writing skills over time in individuals with PPA.
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en
dc.titleWritten Narrative Analysis in Primary Progressive Aphasiaen_US
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen
thesis.degree.levelbachelorsen
thesis.degree.disciplineHonors Collegeen
thesis.degree.disciplineSpeech, Language, and Hearing Sciencesen
thesis.degree.nameB.S.en
refterms.dateFOA2018-08-19T15:34:31Z
html.description.abstractPrimary Progressive Aphasia (PPA) is a slow-onset language disorder associated with cortical atrophy affecting critical language regions of the brain. There are three recognized variants of PPA, and they have been characterized on the basis of spoken language comprehension and production, as well as the location of cortical atrophy. Although written language is also impaired in PPA, the research in this area is limited, especially at the text level. The aim of this paper was to characterize the written narrative language samples of three individuals, each diagnosed with a different variant of PPA. Because PPA differentially degrades underlying cognitive processes fundamental to language performance (i.e., semantics, phonology, syntax, and orthography), we predicted that written language profiles would vary accordingly. Damage to phonological processing would be associated with a decline in the grammatical accuracy of sentences. Written narratives were compared to spoken narratives, and samples were analyzed for each variant at two points in time, to understand the progression of decline of written language. We found that written narratives had fewer words, but greater proportion of content. Overall, written narratives degraded phonological skills were, in fact, associated with the production of sentences that were not well-formed. These data support further investigation of narrative writing skills over time in individuals with PPA.


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