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dc.contributor.advisorHongu, Nobukoen
dc.contributor.authorLewis, Gillian Renee
dc.creatorLewis, Gillian Reneeen
dc.date.accessioned2017-07-28T21:08:41Z
dc.date.available2017-07-28T21:08:41Z
dc.date.issued2017
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/625037
dc.description.abstractAfter our previous study revealed a positive correlation between a high number of nutrition classes and healthy dietary habits, we analyzed the impact of one nutrition class on dietary habits. The objective of this study was to examine the effectiveness of one introductory nutrition class in raising awareness of healthy dietary habits and inspiring healthy changes. Undergraduate students in NSC 170 were given pre-surveys the second week of class (n = 364) and post-surveys the last week of class (n = 281). Both pre- and post-surveys contained questions about demographic information, meal preparation, dietary habits, and dietary self-assessment. The pre-survey revealed a significant relationship between increased age and self-perception of an unhealthy diet (p = 0.066), a significant decrease in fast food meals with age (p = 0.018), and increased fruit and vegetable consumption with nutrition majors. The post-survey revealed a significant relationship between increased academic status and self-perception of a healthy diet (p = 0.053) and a significant relationship between weight loss and self-perception of a healthy diet (p = 0.0125). A comparison of pre- and post-surveys revealed a decrease in the number of fast food meals in juniors and a significant increase in vegetables among nutrition majors.
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en
dc.titleSelf-Reporting a Healthy Diet and Dietary Practices Among Undergraduate Nutrition and Non-Nutrition Majorsen_US
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen
thesis.degree.levelbachelorsen
thesis.degree.disciplineHonors Collegeen
thesis.degree.disciplineNutritional Sciencesen
thesis.degree.nameB.S.en
refterms.dateFOA2018-09-11T21:54:20Z
html.description.abstractAfter our previous study revealed a positive correlation between a high number of nutrition classes and healthy dietary habits, we analyzed the impact of one nutrition class on dietary habits. The objective of this study was to examine the effectiveness of one introductory nutrition class in raising awareness of healthy dietary habits and inspiring healthy changes. Undergraduate students in NSC 170 were given pre-surveys the second week of class (n = 364) and post-surveys the last week of class (n = 281). Both pre- and post-surveys contained questions about demographic information, meal preparation, dietary habits, and dietary self-assessment. The pre-survey revealed a significant relationship between increased age and self-perception of an unhealthy diet (p = 0.066), a significant decrease in fast food meals with age (p = 0.018), and increased fruit and vegetable consumption with nutrition majors. The post-survey revealed a significant relationship between increased academic status and self-perception of a healthy diet (p = 0.053) and a significant relationship between weight loss and self-perception of a healthy diet (p = 0.0125). A comparison of pre- and post-surveys revealed a decrease in the number of fast food meals in juniors and a significant increase in vegetables among nutrition majors.


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