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dc.contributor.authorStiepen, A.
dc.contributor.authorJain, Sonal K.
dc.contributor.authorSchneider, N. M.
dc.contributor.authorDeighan, J. I.
dc.contributor.authorGonzález-Galindo, F.
dc.contributor.authorGérard, J.-C.
dc.contributor.authorMilby, Z.
dc.contributor.authorStevens, M. H.
dc.contributor.authorBougher, S.
dc.contributor.authorEvans, J. S.
dc.contributor.authorStewart, A. I. F.
dc.contributor.authorChaffin, M. S.
dc.contributor.authorCrismani, M.
dc.contributor.authorMcClintock, W. E.
dc.contributor.authorClarke, J. T.
dc.contributor.authorHolsclaw, G. M.
dc.contributor.authorMontmessin, F.
dc.contributor.authorLefèvre, F.
dc.contributor.authorForget, F.
dc.contributor.authorLo, D. Y.
dc.contributor.authorHubert, B.
dc.contributor.authorJakosky, B. M.
dc.date.accessioned2017-08-01T16:32:09Z
dc.date.available2017-08-01T16:32:09Z
dc.date.issued2017-05
dc.identifier.citationNitric oxide nightglow and Martian mesospheric circulation from MAVEN/IUVS observations and LMD-MGCM predictions 2017, 122 (5):5782 Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physicsen
dc.identifier.issn21699380
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/2016JA023523
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/625053
dc.description.abstractWe report results from a study of nitric oxide nightglow over the northern hemisphere of Mars during winter, the southern hemisphere during fall equinox, and equatorial latitudes during summer in the northern hemisphere based on observations of the and bands between 190 and 270nm by the Imaging UltraViolet Spectrograph (IUVS) on the Mars Atmosphere and Volatile EvolutioN mission (MAVEN) spacecraft. The emission reveals recombination of N and O atoms dissociated on the dayside of Mars and transported to the nightside. We characterize the brightness (from 0.2 to 30kR) and altitude (from 40 to 115km) of the NO nightglow layer, as well as its topside scale height (mean of 11km). We show the possible impact of atmospheric waves forcing longitudinal variability, associated with an increased brightness by a factor of 3 in the 140-200 degrees longitude region in the northern hemisphere winter and in the -102 degrees to -48 degrees longitude region at summer. Such impact to the NO nightglow at Mars was not seen before. Quantitative comparison with calculations of the LMD-MGCM (Laboratoire de Meteorologie Dynamique-Mars Global Climate Model) suggests that the model globally reproduces the trends of the NO nightglow emission and its seasonal variation and also indicates large discrepancies (up to a factor 50 fainter in the model) in northern winter at low to middle latitudes. This suggests that the predicted transport is too efficient toward the night winter pole in the thermosphere by approximate to 20 degrees latitude north.
dc.description.sponsorshipFund for Scientific Research (F.R.S.-FNRS); NASA; University of Colorado; NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center; NASA MAVEN Participating Scientist program; SCOOP/BRAIN program of the Belgian Federal Government; European Union [UPWARDS-633127]en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherAMER GEOPHYSICAL UNIONen
dc.relation.urlhttp://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2016JA023523en
dc.rights©2017. American Geophysical Union. All Rights Reserved.en
dc.titleNitric oxide nightglow and Martian mesospheric circulation from MAVEN/IUVS observations and LMD-MGCM predictionsen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniv Arizona, Lunar & Planetary Laben
dc.identifier.journalJournal of Geophysical Research: Space Physicsen
dc.description.note6 month embargo; First published: 31 May 2017en
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item from the UA Faculty Publications collection is made available by the University of Arizona with support from the University of Arizona Libraries. If you have questions, please contact us at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.en
dc.eprint.versionFinal published versionen
dc.contributor.institutionLaboratoire de Physique Atmosphérique et Planétaire, Space sciences, Technologies and Astrophysics Research (STAR) Institute; University of Liège; Liège Belgium
dc.contributor.institutionLaboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics (LASP); University of Colorado Boulder; Boulder Colorado USA
dc.contributor.institutionLaboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics (LASP); University of Colorado Boulder; Boulder Colorado USA
dc.contributor.institutionLaboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics (LASP); University of Colorado Boulder; Boulder Colorado USA
dc.contributor.institutionInstituto de Astrofísica de Andalucía; CSIC; Granada Spain
dc.contributor.institutionLaboratoire de Physique Atmosphérique et Planétaire, Space sciences, Technologies and Astrophysics Research (STAR) Institute; University of Liège; Liège Belgium
dc.contributor.institutionLaboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics (LASP); University of Colorado Boulder; Boulder Colorado USA
dc.contributor.institutionSpace Science Division; Naval Research Laboratory; Washington District of Columbia USA
dc.contributor.institutionClimate and Space Sciences and Engineering Department; University of Michigan; Ann Arbor Michigan USA
dc.contributor.institutionComputational Physics, Inc.; Springfield Virginia USA
dc.contributor.institutionLaboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics (LASP); University of Colorado Boulder; Boulder Colorado USA
dc.contributor.institutionLaboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics (LASP); University of Colorado Boulder; Boulder Colorado USA
dc.contributor.institutionLaboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics (LASP); University of Colorado Boulder; Boulder Colorado USA
dc.contributor.institutionLaboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics (LASP); University of Colorado Boulder; Boulder Colorado USA
dc.contributor.institutionCenter for Space Physics; Boston University; Boston Massachusetts USA
dc.contributor.institutionLaboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics (LASP); University of Colorado Boulder; Boulder Colorado USA
dc.contributor.institutionLATMOS/IPSL; Guyancourt France
dc.contributor.institutionLATMOS/IPSL; Guyancourt France
dc.contributor.institutionLaboratoire de Météorologie Dynamique (LMD); Paris France
dc.contributor.institutionLunar and Planetary Laboratory; University of Arizona; Tucson Arizona USA
dc.contributor.institutionLaboratoire de Physique Atmosphérique et Planétaire, Space sciences, Technologies and Astrophysics Research (STAR) Institute; University of Liège; Liège Belgium
dc.contributor.institutionLaboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics (LASP); University of Colorado Boulder; Boulder Colorado USA
refterms.dateFOA2017-12-01T00:00:00Z
html.description.abstractWe report results from a study of nitric oxide nightglow over the northern hemisphere of Mars during winter, the southern hemisphere during fall equinox, and equatorial latitudes during summer in the northern hemisphere based on observations of the and bands between 190 and 270nm by the Imaging UltraViolet Spectrograph (IUVS) on the Mars Atmosphere and Volatile EvolutioN mission (MAVEN) spacecraft. The emission reveals recombination of N and O atoms dissociated on the dayside of Mars and transported to the nightside. We characterize the brightness (from 0.2 to 30kR) and altitude (from 40 to 115km) of the NO nightglow layer, as well as its topside scale height (mean of 11km). We show the possible impact of atmospheric waves forcing longitudinal variability, associated with an increased brightness by a factor of 3 in the 140-200 degrees longitude region in the northern hemisphere winter and in the -102 degrees to -48 degrees longitude region at summer. Such impact to the NO nightglow at Mars was not seen before. Quantitative comparison with calculations of the LMD-MGCM (Laboratoire de Meteorologie Dynamique-Mars Global Climate Model) suggests that the model globally reproduces the trends of the NO nightglow emission and its seasonal variation and also indicates large discrepancies (up to a factor 50 fainter in the model) in northern winter at low to middle latitudes. This suggests that the predicted transport is too efficient toward the night winter pole in the thermosphere by approximate to 20 degrees latitude north.


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