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dc.contributor.advisorMeixner, Thomasen
dc.contributor.authorPereira, Mekha
dc.contributor.authorThompson, Dick
dc.creatorPereira, Mekhaen
dc.creatorThompson, Dicken
dc.date.accessioned2017-08-08T17:34:59Z
dc.date.available2017-08-08T17:34:59Z
dc.date.issued2017
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/625120
dc.description.abstractReclaimed water is an important renewable resource because it mitigates the use of potable supplies to meet outdoor water demand. In Tucson, reclaimed water is managed through aquifer storage and recovery. Some recharge is done directly in the Santa Cruz River where credits are earned for water that infiltrates in a permitted stretch. The new Pima County water treatment facility, Agua Nueva, releases high quality Class A effluent, which infiltrates the river at higher rates than water from the previous facility. This study monitored the discharge from Agua Nueva and aimed to quantify instream recharge rates. Gaining higher spatial resolution on recharge is important for verifying current recharge credits, and modeling water demand of future effluent-use projects. Water level was continually measured at four river monitoring stations. A mass balance method was used to estimate recharge by calculating differences in streamflow between upstream and downstream stations. Because of the highly variable outflow from Agua Nueva, this method’s results were inconclusive. The study resulted in development of an effective way to temporarily deploy divers in highly variable Southwest streams experiencing intense monsoons. The water level data gathered provided new insight to patterns of effluent flow in the Lower Santa Cruz River.
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en
dc.titleA Study of Improved Quality Effluent Discharged From Agua Nueva Water Reclamation Facility to the Lower Santa Cruz Riveren_US
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen
thesis.degree.levelbachelorsen
thesis.degree.disciplineHonors Collegeen
thesis.degree.disciplineEnvironmental Hydrology and Water Resourcesen
thesis.degree.nameB.S.en
refterms.dateFOA2018-08-18T13:44:39Z
html.description.abstractReclaimed water is an important renewable resource because it mitigates the use of potable supplies to meet outdoor water demand. In Tucson, reclaimed water is managed through aquifer storage and recovery. Some recharge is done directly in the Santa Cruz River where credits are earned for water that infiltrates in a permitted stretch. The new Pima County water treatment facility, Agua Nueva, releases high quality Class A effluent, which infiltrates the river at higher rates than water from the previous facility. This study monitored the discharge from Agua Nueva and aimed to quantify instream recharge rates. Gaining higher spatial resolution on recharge is important for verifying current recharge credits, and modeling water demand of future effluent-use projects. Water level was continually measured at four river monitoring stations. A mass balance method was used to estimate recharge by calculating differences in streamflow between upstream and downstream stations. Because of the highly variable outflow from Agua Nueva, this method’s results were inconclusive. The study resulted in development of an effective way to temporarily deploy divers in highly variable Southwest streams experiencing intense monsoons. The water level data gathered provided new insight to patterns of effluent flow in the Lower Santa Cruz River.


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