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dc.contributor.advisorGallery, Rachelen
dc.contributor.advisorHackett, Jeremiahen
dc.contributor.authorScheid, Amy Elizabeth
dc.creatorScheid, Amy Elizabethen
dc.date.accessioned2017-08-08T19:30:15Z
dc.date.available2017-08-08T19:30:15Z
dc.date.issued2017
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/625145
dc.description.abstractClimate change is altering the function of ecosystems across the planet, including the semi-arid soil ecosystems like those found in the Arizonan desert. Soil enzymes produced by microbes are essential to these ecosystems, and their productivity is threatened by the predicted rise in temperature. In this study, seven different soil enzymes were studied to observe how seasonality, soil water content, and plant cover affected the activity of these enzymes through experimental warming. It was concluded that seasonality and plant cover have direct effects on enzymatic activity, while the soil water content cannot be correlated with the activity of all soil enzymes. The results of these different variables when being measured with one anther and the soil enzyme activity did not provide any conclusive results, further asserting the intricacy of these soil enzyme interactions and how future studies need to be conducted in order to better understand the complexities of these soil variable interactions.
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en
dc.titleExperimental Warming Changes Microbial Enzyme Activity in Semiarid Soilsen_US
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen
thesis.degree.levelbachelorsen
thesis.degree.disciplineHonors Collegeen
thesis.degree.disciplineBiomedical Sciencesen
thesis.degree.nameB.S.en
refterms.dateFOA2018-06-19T09:45:44Z
html.description.abstractClimate change is altering the function of ecosystems across the planet, including the semi-arid soil ecosystems like those found in the Arizonan desert. Soil enzymes produced by microbes are essential to these ecosystems, and their productivity is threatened by the predicted rise in temperature. In this study, seven different soil enzymes were studied to observe how seasonality, soil water content, and plant cover affected the activity of these enzymes through experimental warming. It was concluded that seasonality and plant cover have direct effects on enzymatic activity, while the soil water content cannot be correlated with the activity of all soil enzymes. The results of these different variables when being measured with one anther and the soil enzyme activity did not provide any conclusive results, further asserting the intricacy of these soil enzyme interactions and how future studies need to be conducted in order to better understand the complexities of these soil variable interactions.


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