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dc.contributor.authorRay, Aniruddha
dc.contributor.authorDaloglu, Mustafa Ugur
dc.contributor.authorHo, Joslynn
dc.contributor.authorTorres, Avee
dc.contributor.authorMcleod, Euan
dc.contributor.authorOzcan, Aydogan
dc.date.accessioned2017-08-09T21:52:01Z
dc.date.available2017-08-09T21:52:01Z
dc.date.issued2017-07-07
dc.identifier.citationComputational sensing of herpes simplex virus using a cost-effective on-chip microscope 2017, 7 (1) Scientific Reportsen
dc.identifier.issn2045-2322
dc.identifier.pmid28687769
dc.identifier.doi10.1038/s41598-017-05124-3
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/625181
dc.description.abstractCaused by the herpes simplex virus (HSV), herpes is a viral infection that is one of the most widespread diseases worldwide. Here we present a computational sensing technique for specific detection of HSV using both viral immuno-specificity and the physical size range of the viruses. This label-free approach involves a compact and cost-effective holographic on-chip microscope and a surface-functionalized glass substrate prepared to specifically capture the target viruses. To enhance the optical signatures of individual viruses and increase their signal-to-noise ratio, self-assembled polyethylene glycol based nanolenses are rapidly formed around each virus particle captured on the substrate using a portable interface. Holographic shadows of specifically captured viruses that are surrounded by these self-assembled nanolenses are then reconstructed, and the phase image is used for automated quantification of the size of each particle within our large field-of-view, similar to 30 mm(2). The combination of viral immuno-specificity due to surface functionalization and the physical size measurements enabled by holographic imaging is used to sensitively detect and enumerate HSV particles using our compact and cost-effective platform. This computational sensing technique can find numerous uses in global health related applications in resource-limited environments.
dc.description.sponsorshipPresidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers (PECASE); Army Research Office (ARO) [W911NF-13-1-0419, W911NF-13-1-0197]; ARO Life Sciences Division; National Science Foundation (NSF) CBET Division Biophotonics Program; NSF Emerging Frontiers in Research and Innovation (EFRI) Award; NSF EAGER Award; NSF INSPIRE Award; NSF Partnerships for Innovation: Building Innovation Capacity (PFI: BIC) Program; Howard Hughes Medical Institute(HHMI); Vodafone Americas Foundation; KAUST; National Science Foundation [0963183]; American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA); Office of Naval Research (ONR)en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherNATURE PUBLISHING GROUPen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.nature.com/articles/s41598-017-05124-3en
dc.rights© The Author(s) 2017. Open Access: This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.en
dc.titleComputational sensing of herpes simplex virus using a cost-effective on-chip microscopeen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniv Arizona, Coll Opt Scien
dc.identifier.journalScientific Reportsen
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item from the UA Faculty Publications collection is made available by the University of Arizona with support from the University of Arizona Libraries. If you have questions, please contact us at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.en
dc.eprint.versionFinal published versionen
refterms.dateFOA2018-09-11T22:07:02Z
html.description.abstractCaused by the herpes simplex virus (HSV), herpes is a viral infection that is one of the most widespread diseases worldwide. Here we present a computational sensing technique for specific detection of HSV using both viral immuno-specificity and the physical size range of the viruses. This label-free approach involves a compact and cost-effective holographic on-chip microscope and a surface-functionalized glass substrate prepared to specifically capture the target viruses. To enhance the optical signatures of individual viruses and increase their signal-to-noise ratio, self-assembled polyethylene glycol based nanolenses are rapidly formed around each virus particle captured on the substrate using a portable interface. Holographic shadows of specifically captured viruses that are surrounded by these self-assembled nanolenses are then reconstructed, and the phase image is used for automated quantification of the size of each particle within our large field-of-view, similar to 30 mm(2). The combination of viral immuno-specificity due to surface functionalization and the physical size measurements enabled by holographic imaging is used to sensitively detect and enumerate HSV particles using our compact and cost-effective platform. This computational sensing technique can find numerous uses in global health related applications in resource-limited environments.


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