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dc.contributor.authorLemoine, Derek
dc.date.accessioned2017-08-09T23:57:59Z
dc.date.available2017-08-09T23:57:59Z
dc.date.issued2017-07
dc.identifier.citationGreen Expectations: Current Effects of Anticipated Carbon Pricing 2017, 99 (3):499 The Review of Economics and Statisticsen
dc.identifier.issn0034-6535
dc.identifier.issn1530-9142
dc.identifier.doi10.1162/REST_a_00627
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/625215
dc.description.abstractI report evidence that an anticipated strengthening of environmental policy increased emissions. I find that the breakdown of the U.S. Senate's 2010 climate effort generated positive excess returns in coal futures markets. This response appears to be driven by an increase in coal storage. The proposed legislation aimed to reduce U.S. greenhouse gas emissions after 2013, but the legislative process itself may have increased emissions by over 12 million tons of carbon dioxide leading up to April 2010.
dc.description.sponsorshipUniversity of Arizona's Renewable Energy Networken
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherMIT PRESSen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.mitpressjournals.org/doi/abs/10.1162/REST_a_00627en
dc.rights© 2017 The President and Fellows of Harvard College and the Massachusetts Institute of Technologyen
dc.titleGreen Expectations: Current Effects of Anticipated Carbon Pricingen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniv Arizonaen
dc.identifier.journalThe Review of Economics and Statisticsen
dc.description.note24 month embargo; Published online: 17 July 2017en
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item from the UA Faculty Publications collection is made available by the University of Arizona with support from the University of Arizona Libraries. If you have questions, please contact us at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.en
dc.eprint.versionFinal published versionen
dc.contributor.institutionUniversity of Arizona
html.description.abstractI report evidence that an anticipated strengthening of environmental policy increased emissions. I find that the breakdown of the U.S. Senate's 2010 climate effort generated positive excess returns in coal futures markets. This response appears to be driven by an increase in coal storage. The proposed legislation aimed to reduce U.S. greenhouse gas emissions after 2013, but the legislative process itself may have increased emissions by over 12 million tons of carbon dioxide leading up to April 2010.


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