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dc.contributor.authorHibbeln, Martin
dc.contributor.authorJenkins, Jeffrey L.
dc.contributor.authorSchneider, Christoph
dc.contributor.authorValacich, Joseph S.
dc.contributor.authorWeinmann, Markus
dc.date.accessioned2017-08-10T22:06:51Z
dc.date.available2017-08-10T22:06:51Z
dc.date.issued2017-03
dc.identifier.citationHibbeln, M., Jenkins, J. L., Schneider, C., Valacich, J. S., & Weinmann, M. (2017). HOW IS YOUR USER FEELING? INFERRING EMOTION THROUGH HUMAN–COMPUTER INTERACTION DEVICES. MIS Quarterly, 41(1), 1-A7.en
dc.identifier.issn0276-7783
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/625245
dc.description.abstractEmotion can influence important user behaviors, including purchasing decisions, technology use, and customer loyalty. The ability to easily assess users' emotion during live system use therefore has practical significance for the design and improvement of information systems. In this paper, we discuss using human-computer interaction input devices to infer emotion. Specifically, we utilize attentional control theory to explain how movement captured via a computer mouse (i.e., mouse cursor movements) can be a real-time indicator of negative emotion. We report three studies. In Study 1, an experiment with 65 participants from Amazon's Mechanical Turk, we randomly manipulated negative emotion and then monitored participants' mouse cursor movements as they completed a number-ordering task. We found that negative emotion increases the distance and reduces the speed of mouse cursor movements during the task. In Study 2, an experiment with 126 participants from a U.S. university, we randomly manipulated negative emotion and then monitored participants' mouse cursor movements while they interacted with a mock e-commerce site. We found that mouse cursor distance and speed can be used to infer the presence of negative emotion with an overall accuracy rate of 81.7 percent. In Study 3, an observational study with 80 participants from universities in Germany and Hong Kong, we monitored mouse cursor movements while participants interacted with an online product configurator. Participants reported their level of emotion after each step in the configuration process. We found that mouse cursor distance and speed can be used to infer the level of negative emotion with an out-of-sample R-2 of 0.17. The results enable researchers to assess negative emotional reactions during live system use, examine emotional reactions with more temporal precision, conduct multimethod emotion research, and create more unobtrusive affective and adaptive systems.
dc.description.sponsorshipCity University of Hong Kong [7002626, 7004123]; Research Grants Council of the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region [CityU149512]en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherSOC INFORM MANAGE-MIS RES CENTen
dc.relation.urlhttp://misq.org/how-is-your-user-feeling-inferring-emotion-through-human-computer-interaction-devices.htmlen
dc.rightsCopyright © of MIS Quarterly.en
dc.rights.urihttp://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/
dc.subjectNegative emotionen
dc.subjectattentional control theory (ACT)en
dc.subjectmouse cursor distanceen
dc.subjectmouse cursor speeden
dc.subjectmouse trackingen
dc.subjecthuman-computer interactionen
dc.titleHOW IS YOUR USER FEELING? INFERRING EMOTION THROUGH HUMAN-COMPUTER INTERACTION DEVICESen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniv Arizona, Management Informat Systen
dc.identifier.journalMIS QUARTERLYen
dc.description.note60 month embargo; Published online: March 2017en
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item from the UA Faculty Publications collection is made available by the University of Arizona with support from the University of Arizona Libraries. If you have questions, please contact us at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.en
dc.eprint.versionFinal published versionen
html.description.abstractEmotion can influence important user behaviors, including purchasing decisions, technology use, and customer loyalty. The ability to easily assess users' emotion during live system use therefore has practical significance for the design and improvement of information systems. In this paper, we discuss using human-computer interaction input devices to infer emotion. Specifically, we utilize attentional control theory to explain how movement captured via a computer mouse (i.e., mouse cursor movements) can be a real-time indicator of negative emotion. We report three studies. In Study 1, an experiment with 65 participants from Amazon's Mechanical Turk, we randomly manipulated negative emotion and then monitored participants' mouse cursor movements as they completed a number-ordering task. We found that negative emotion increases the distance and reduces the speed of mouse cursor movements during the task. In Study 2, an experiment with 126 participants from a U.S. university, we randomly manipulated negative emotion and then monitored participants' mouse cursor movements while they interacted with a mock e-commerce site. We found that mouse cursor distance and speed can be used to infer the presence of negative emotion with an overall accuracy rate of 81.7 percent. In Study 3, an observational study with 80 participants from universities in Germany and Hong Kong, we monitored mouse cursor movements while participants interacted with an online product configurator. Participants reported their level of emotion after each step in the configuration process. We found that mouse cursor distance and speed can be used to infer the level of negative emotion with an out-of-sample R-2 of 0.17. The results enable researchers to assess negative emotional reactions during live system use, examine emotional reactions with more temporal precision, conduct multimethod emotion research, and create more unobtrusive affective and adaptive systems.


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