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dc.contributor.advisorSchwalbe, Carol B.en
dc.contributor.authorBakina, Wellars
dc.creatorBakina, Wellarsen
dc.date.accessioned2017-08-21T19:57:45Z
dc.date.available2017-08-21T19:57:45Z
dc.date.issued2017
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/625283
dc.description.abstractScholars of intermedia agenda-setting have examined how news organizations can affect one another's content, but research is lacking on the influence of foreign news programs on fledging media outlets, such as Rwanda Television (RTV). A quantitative content analysis conducted between October and December 2016 indicates that media outlets in core countries dominated RTV's international news edition, which depended mostly on foreign programs, mainly from Euronews and Al Jazeera English. The 2016 U.S. election was the predominant topic. More than half the stories had a negative tone. In addition, qualitative interviews with the RTV editorial team revealed that the main factors influencing story selection were proximity, prominence, impact, cultural values, and relevance. Cross-lagged correlation coefficients indicated that both RTV and two Rwandan newspapers—igihe.com and Imvaho Nshya—focused on the same news topics but with slightly different sources. In Rwanda, the defining factors for this intermedia agenda-setting are not media type, ownership, or technology, as other studies have found, but institutional barriers, language, and the globalization of news. Faced with limited finances and a shortage of trained journalists, fledging media organizations in Rwanda will continue to depend on big media for their daily international news. Strategies are suggested for helping to break the cycle of foreign media domination and news homogenization in Rwanda
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en
dc.subjectdigital televisionen
dc.subjectigihe.comen
dc.subjectImvaho Nshyaen
dc.subjectintermedia agenda-settingen
dc.subjectinternational newsen
dc.subjectRwanda Televisionen
dc.titleThe Influence of Foreign News Programs on the International News Agenda of Rwandan Television and Newspapersen_US
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen
thesis.degree.levelmastersen
dc.contributor.committeememberSchwalbe, Carol B.en
dc.contributor.committeememberRelly, Jeannine E.en
dc.contributor.committeememberCruikshank, Sally A.en
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen
thesis.degree.disciplineJournalismen
thesis.degree.nameM.A.en
refterms.dateFOA2018-07-06T01:20:35Z
html.description.abstractScholars of intermedia agenda-setting have examined how news organizations can affect one another's content, but research is lacking on the influence of foreign news programs on fledging media outlets, such as Rwanda Television (RTV). A quantitative content analysis conducted between October and December 2016 indicates that media outlets in core countries dominated RTV's international news edition, which depended mostly on foreign programs, mainly from Euronews and Al Jazeera English. The 2016 U.S. election was the predominant topic. More than half the stories had a negative tone. In addition, qualitative interviews with the RTV editorial team revealed that the main factors influencing story selection were proximity, prominence, impact, cultural values, and relevance. Cross-lagged correlation coefficients indicated that both RTV and two Rwandan newspapers—igihe.com and Imvaho Nshya—focused on the same news topics but with slightly different sources. In Rwanda, the defining factors for this intermedia agenda-setting are not media type, ownership, or technology, as other studies have found, but institutional barriers, language, and the globalization of news. Faced with limited finances and a shortage of trained journalists, fledging media organizations in Rwanda will continue to depend on big media for their daily international news. Strategies are suggested for helping to break the cycle of foreign media domination and news homogenization in Rwanda


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