Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorCoulthard, Bethany L
dc.contributor.authorTouchan, Ramzi
dc.contributor.authorAnchukaitis, Kevin J
dc.contributor.authorMeko, David M
dc.contributor.authorSivrikaya, Fatih
dc.date.accessioned2017-08-22T23:38:44Z
dc.date.available2017-08-22T23:38:44Z
dc.date.issued2017-08-01
dc.identifier.citationTree growth and vegetation activity at the ecosystem-scale in the eastern Mediterranean 2017, 12 (8):084008 Environmental Research Lettersen
dc.identifier.issn1748-9326
dc.identifier.doi10.1088/1748-9326/aa7b26
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/625304
dc.description.abstractLinking annual tree growth with remotely-sensed terrestrial vegetation indices provides a basis for using tree rings as proxies for ecosystem primary productivity over large spatial and long temporal scales. In contrast with most previous tree ring/remote sensing studies that have focused on temperature-limited boreal and taiga environments, here we compare the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) with a network of Pinus brutia tree ring width chronologies collected along ecological gradients in semiarid Cyprus, where both radial tree growth and broader vegetation activity are controlled by drought. We find that the interaction between precipitation, elevation, and land-cover type generate a relationship between radial tree growth and NDVI. While tree ring chronologies at higher-elevation forested sites do not exhibit climatedriven linkages with NDVI, chronologies at lower-elevation dry sites are strongly correlated with NDVI during the winter precipitation season. At lower-elevation sites, land cover is dominated by grasslands and shrublands and tree ring widths operate as a proxy for ecosystem-scale vegetation activity. Tree rings can therefore be used to reconstruct productivity in water-limited grasslands and shrublands, where future drought stress is expected to alter the global carbon cycle, biodiversity, and ecosystem functioning in the 21st century.
dc.description.sponsorshipUS National Science Foundation; ATMGEO/ATM-Paleoclimate Program [0758486]; AGS-Paleo Perspectives on Climate Change Program [1103314]en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherIOP PUBLISHING LTDen
dc.relation.urlhttp://stacks.iop.org/1748-9326/12/i=8/a=084008?key=crossref.cd610626414e693299633c40dc826b15en
dc.rights© 2017 The Author(s). Published by IOP Publishing Ltden
dc.subjectCyprusen
dc.subjectremote sensingen
dc.subjectdendrochronologyen
dc.subjectNDVIen
dc.subjectdroughten
dc.subjectgrasslandsen
dc.subjectshrublandsen
dc.titleTree growth and vegetation activity at the ecosystem-scale in the eastern Mediterraneanen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniv Arizona, Lab Tree Ring Resen
dc.contributor.departmentUniv Arizona, Sch Geog & Deven
dc.identifier.journalEnvironmental Research Lettersen
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item from the UA Faculty Publications collection is made available by the University of Arizona with support from the University of Arizona Libraries. If you have questions, please contact us at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.en
dc.eprint.versionFinal published versionen
refterms.dateFOA2018-06-15T22:01:23Z
html.description.abstractLinking annual tree growth with remotely-sensed terrestrial vegetation indices provides a basis for using tree rings as proxies for ecosystem primary productivity over large spatial and long temporal scales. In contrast with most previous tree ring/remote sensing studies that have focused on temperature-limited boreal and taiga environments, here we compare the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) with a network of Pinus brutia tree ring width chronologies collected along ecological gradients in semiarid Cyprus, where both radial tree growth and broader vegetation activity are controlled by drought. We find that the interaction between precipitation, elevation, and land-cover type generate a relationship between radial tree growth and NDVI. While tree ring chronologies at higher-elevation forested sites do not exhibit climatedriven linkages with NDVI, chronologies at lower-elevation dry sites are strongly correlated with NDVI during the winter precipitation season. At lower-elevation sites, land cover is dominated by grasslands and shrublands and tree ring widths operate as a proxy for ecosystem-scale vegetation activity. Tree rings can therefore be used to reconstruct productivity in water-limited grasslands and shrublands, where future drought stress is expected to alter the global carbon cycle, biodiversity, and ecosystem functioning in the 21st century.


Files in this item

Thumbnail
Name:
Coulthard_2017_Environ._Res._L ...
Size:
1.246Mb
Format:
PDF
Description:
FInal Published Version

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record