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dc.contributor.authorRuby, Norman F.
dc.contributor.authorFisher, Nathan
dc.contributor.authorPatton, Danica F.
dc.contributor.authorPaul, Matthew J.
dc.contributor.authorFernandez, Fabian
dc.contributor.authorHeller, H. Craig
dc.date.accessioned2017-08-23T23:20:18Z
dc.date.available2017-08-23T23:20:18Z
dc.date.issued2017-07-28
dc.identifier.citationScheduled feeding restores memory and modulates c-Fos expression in the suprachiasmatic nucleus and septohippocampal complex 2017, 7 (1) Scientific Reportsen
dc.identifier.issn2045-2322
dc.identifier.doi10.1038/s41598-017-06963-w
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/625333
dc.description.abstractDisruptions in circadian timing impair spatial memory in humans and rodents. Circadian-arrhythmic Siberian hamsters (Phodopus sungorus) exhibit substantial deficits in spatial working memory as assessed by a spontaneous alternation (SA) task. The present study found that daily scheduled feeding rescued spatial memory deficits in these arrhythmic animals. Improvements in memory persisted for at least 3 weeks after the arrhythmic hamsters were switched back to ad libitum feeding. During ad libitum feeding, locomotor activity resumed its arrhythmic state, but performance on the SA task varied across the day with a peak in daily performance that corresponded to the previous daily window of food anticipation. At the end of scheduled feeding, c-Fos brain mapping revealed differential gene expression in entrained versus arrhythmic hamsters in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) that paralleled changes in the medial septum and hippocampus, but not in other neural structures. These data show that scheduled feeding can improve cognitive performance when SCN timing has been compromised, possibly by coordinating activity in the SCN and septohippocampal pathway.
dc.description.sponsorshipNational Institute of Mental Health [MH095837]; Science Foundation Arizona (SFAz); BIO5 Institute at the University of Arizonaen
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherNATURE PUBLISHING GROUPen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.nature.com/articles/s41598-017-06963-wen
dc.rights© The Author(s) 2017. This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.en
dc.titleScheduled feeding restores memory and modulates c-Fos expression in the suprachiasmatic nucleus and septohippocampal complexen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniv Arizona, Dept Psychol, Inst BIO5en
dc.contributor.departmentUniv Arizona, Dept Neurol, Inst BIO5en
dc.contributor.departmentUniv Arizona, Evelyn F McKnight Brain Insten
dc.identifier.journalScientific Reportsen
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item from the UA Faculty Publications collection is made available by the University of Arizona with support from the University of Arizona Libraries. If you have questions, please contact us at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.en
dc.eprint.versionFinal published versionen
refterms.dateFOA2018-07-02T23:13:21Z
html.description.abstractDisruptions in circadian timing impair spatial memory in humans and rodents. Circadian-arrhythmic Siberian hamsters (Phodopus sungorus) exhibit substantial deficits in spatial working memory as assessed by a spontaneous alternation (SA) task. The present study found that daily scheduled feeding rescued spatial memory deficits in these arrhythmic animals. Improvements in memory persisted for at least 3 weeks after the arrhythmic hamsters were switched back to ad libitum feeding. During ad libitum feeding, locomotor activity resumed its arrhythmic state, but performance on the SA task varied across the day with a peak in daily performance that corresponded to the previous daily window of food anticipation. At the end of scheduled feeding, c-Fos brain mapping revealed differential gene expression in entrained versus arrhythmic hamsters in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) that paralleled changes in the medial septum and hippocampus, but not in other neural structures. These data show that scheduled feeding can improve cognitive performance when SCN timing has been compromised, possibly by coordinating activity in the SCN and septohippocampal pathway.


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