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dc.contributor.authorLynner, Colton
dc.contributor.authorPorritt, Robert W.
dc.date.accessioned2017-08-24T22:30:48Z
dc.date.available2017-08-24T22:30:48Z
dc.date.issued2017-07-16
dc.identifier.citationCrustal structure across the eastern North American margin from ambient noise tomography 2017, 44 (13):6651 Geophysical Research Lettersen
dc.identifier.issn00948276
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/2017GL073500
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/625356
dc.description.abstractPassive tectonic margins, like the eastern North American margin (ENAM), represent the meeting of oceanic and continental material where no active deformation is occurring. The recent ENAM Community Seismic Experiment provides an opportunity to examine the crustal structure across the ENAM owing to the simultaneous deployment of offshore and onshore seismic instrumentation. Using Rayleigh wave phase and group velocities derived from ambient noise data, we invert for shear velocity across the ENAM. We observe a region of transitional crustal thicknesses that connects the oceanic and continental crusts. Associated with the transitional crust is a localized positive gravitational anomaly. Farther east, the East Coast magnetic anomaly (ECMA) is located at the intersection of the transitional and oceanic crusts. We propose that underplating of dense magmatic material along the bottom of the transitional crust is responsible for the gravitational anomaly and that the ECMA demarks the location of initial oceanic crustal formation.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherAMER GEOPHYSICAL UNIONen
dc.relation.urlhttp://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2017GL073500en
dc.rights© 2017. American Geophysical Union. All Rights Reserved.en
dc.rights.urihttp://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/
dc.subjectpassive marginen
dc.subjectambient noiseen
dc.subjecteastern North American marginen
dc.subjectcrustal structureen
dc.titleCrustal structure across the eastern North American margin from ambient noise tomographyen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniv Arizona, Dept Geoscien
dc.identifier.journalGeophysical Research Lettersen
dc.description.note6 month embargo; published online: 3 July 2017en
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item from the UA Faculty Publications collection is made available by the University of Arizona with support from the University of Arizona Libraries. If you have questions, please contact us at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.en
dc.eprint.versionFinal published versionen
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Geosciences; University of Arizona; Tucson Arizona USA
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Geosciences; University of Arizona; Tucson Arizona USA
refterms.dateFOA2018-01-04T00:00:00Z
html.description.abstractPassive tectonic margins, like the eastern North American margin (ENAM), represent the meeting of oceanic and continental material where no active deformation is occurring. The recent ENAM Community Seismic Experiment provides an opportunity to examine the crustal structure across the ENAM owing to the simultaneous deployment of offshore and onshore seismic instrumentation. Using Rayleigh wave phase and group velocities derived from ambient noise data, we invert for shear velocity across the ENAM. We observe a region of transitional crustal thicknesses that connects the oceanic and continental crusts. Associated with the transitional crust is a localized positive gravitational anomaly. Farther east, the East Coast magnetic anomaly (ECMA) is located at the intersection of the transitional and oceanic crusts. We propose that underplating of dense magmatic material along the bottom of the transitional crust is responsible for the gravitational anomaly and that the ECMA demarks the location of initial oceanic crustal formation.


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