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dc.contributor.authorBooth, Mark
dc.contributor.authorDent, William R. F.
dc.contributor.authorJordán, Andrés
dc.contributor.authorLestrade, Jean-François
dc.contributor.authorHales, Antonio S.
dc.contributor.authorWyatt, Mark C.
dc.contributor.authorCasassus, Simon
dc.contributor.authorErtel, Steve
dc.contributor.authorGreaves, Jane S.
dc.contributor.authorKennedy, Grant M.
dc.contributor.authorMatrà, Luca
dc.contributor.authorAugereau, Jean-Charles
dc.contributor.authorVillard, Eric
dc.date.accessioned2017-09-13T15:50:00Z
dc.date.available2017-09-13T15:50:00Z
dc.date.issued2017-08
dc.identifier.citationThe Northern arc of ε Eridani’s Debris Ring as seen by ALMA 2017, 469 (3):3200 Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Societyen
dc.identifier.issn0035-8711
dc.identifier.issn1365-2966
dc.identifier.doi10.1093/mnras/stx1072
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/625481
dc.description.abstractWe present the first Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) observations of the closest known extrasolar debris disc. This disc orbits the star is an element of Eri, a K-type star just 3.2 pc away. Due to the proximity of the star, the entire disc cannot fit within the ALMA field of view. Therefore, the observations have been centred 18" North of the star, providing us with a clear detection of the Northern arc of the ring, at a wavelength of 1.3 mm. The observed disc emission is found to be narrow with a width of just 11-13 AU. The fractional disc width we find is comparable to that of the Solar system's Kuiper Belt and makes this one of the narrowest debris discs known. If the inner and outer edges are due to resonances with a planet then this planet likely has a semi-major axis of 48 AU. We find tentative evidence for clumps in the ring, although there is a strong chance that at least one is a background galaxy. We confirm, at much higher significance, the previous detection of an unresolved emission at the star that is above the level of the photosphere and attribute this excess to stellar chromospheric emission.
dc.description.sponsorshipFONDECYT Postdoctoral Fellowship [3140479]; Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (DFG) [Kr 2164/15-1. AJ]; Millennium Nucleus (Chilean Ministry of Economy) [RC130007]; FONDECYT [1130857]; BASAL [CATAPFB-06]; Ministry for the Economy, Development, and Tourism's Programa Iniciativa Cientifica Milenio [IC 120009]; Millennium Institute of Astrophysics (MAS); European Union through ERC grant [279973]; Royal Society as a Royal Society University Research Fellow; PNP/CNESen
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherOXFORD UNIV PRESSen
dc.relation.urlhttps://academic.oup.com/mnras/article-lookup/doi/10.1093/mnras/stx1072en
dc.rights© 2017 The Authors Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Royal Astronomical Society.en
dc.rights.urihttp://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/
dc.subjectcircumstellarmatteren
dc.subjectstars: individual: epsilon Erien
dc.subjectplanetary systemsen
dc.subjectsubmillimetre: planetary systemsen
dc.subjectsubmillimetre: starsen
dc.titleThe Northern arc of ε Eridani’s Debris Ring as seen by ALMAen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniv Arizona, Steward Observ, Dept Astronen
dc.identifier.journalMonthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Societyen
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item from the UA Faculty Publications collection is made available by the University of Arizona with support from the University of Arizona Libraries. If you have questions, please contact us at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.en
dc.eprint.versionFinal published versionen
refterms.dateFOA2018-06-30T09:38:50Z
html.description.abstractWe present the first Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) observations of the closest known extrasolar debris disc. This disc orbits the star is an element of Eri, a K-type star just 3.2 pc away. Due to the proximity of the star, the entire disc cannot fit within the ALMA field of view. Therefore, the observations have been centred 18" North of the star, providing us with a clear detection of the Northern arc of the ring, at a wavelength of 1.3 mm. The observed disc emission is found to be narrow with a width of just 11-13 AU. The fractional disc width we find is comparable to that of the Solar system's Kuiper Belt and makes this one of the narrowest debris discs known. If the inner and outer edges are due to resonances with a planet then this planet likely has a semi-major axis of 48 AU. We find tentative evidence for clumps in the ring, although there is a strong chance that at least one is a background galaxy. We confirm, at much higher significance, the previous detection of an unresolved emission at the star that is above the level of the photosphere and attribute this excess to stellar chromospheric emission.


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