Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorLevin, Eran*
dc.contributor.authorMcCue, Marshall D.*
dc.contributor.authorDavidowitz, Goggy*
dc.date.accessioned2017-09-14T21:06:21Z
dc.date.available2017-09-14T21:06:21Z
dc.date.issued2017-08-01
dc.identifier.citationSex differences in the utilization of essential and non-essential amino acids in Lepidoptera 2017, 220 (15):2743 The Journal of Experimental Biologyen
dc.identifier.issn0022-0949
dc.identifier.issn1477-9145
dc.identifier.pmid28495867
dc.identifier.doi10.1242/jeb.154757
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/625497
dc.description.abstractThe different reproductive strategies of males and females underlie differences in behavior that may also lead to differences in nutrient use between the two sexes. We studied sex differences in the utilization of two essential amino acids (EAAs) and one non-essential amino acid (NEAA) by the Carolina sphinx moth (Manduca sexta). On day one post-eclosion from the pupae, adult male moths oxidized greater amounts of larva-derived AAs than females, and more nectar-derived AAs after feeding. After 4 days of starvation, the opposite pattern was observed: adult females oxidized more larva- derived AAs than males. Adult males allocated comparatively small amounts of nectar-derived AAs to their first spermatophore, but this allocation increased substantially in the second and third spermatophores. Males allocated significantly more adult-derived AAs to their flight muscle than females. These outcomes indicate that adult male and female moths employ different strategies for allocation and oxidation of dietary AAs.
dc.description.sponsorshipNational Science Foundation USA [IOS-1053318]en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherCOMPANY OF BIOLOGISTS LTDen
dc.relation.urlhttp://jeb.biologists.org/lookup/doi/10.1242/jeb.154757en
dc.rights© 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltden
dc.subjectManduca sextaen
dc.subjectNutrient useen
dc.subjectMetabolismen
dc.subjectStable isotopesen
dc.subjectdelta C-13en
dc.titleSex differences in the utilization of essential and non-essential amino acids in Lepidopteraen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniv Arizona, Dept Entomolen
dc.identifier.journalThe Journal of Experimental Biologyen
dc.description.note12 month embargo; published: 1 August 2017en
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item from the UA Faculty Publications collection is made available by the University of Arizona with support from the University of Arizona Libraries. If you have questions, please contact us at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.en
dc.eprint.versionFinal published versionen
html.description.abstractThe different reproductive strategies of males and females underlie differences in behavior that may also lead to differences in nutrient use between the two sexes. We studied sex differences in the utilization of two essential amino acids (EAAs) and one non-essential amino acid (NEAA) by the Carolina sphinx moth (Manduca sexta). On day one post-eclosion from the pupae, adult male moths oxidized greater amounts of larva-derived AAs than females, and more nectar-derived AAs after feeding. After 4 days of starvation, the opposite pattern was observed: adult females oxidized more larva- derived AAs than males. Adult males allocated comparatively small amounts of nectar-derived AAs to their first spermatophore, but this allocation increased substantially in the second and third spermatophores. Males allocated significantly more adult-derived AAs to their flight muscle than females. These outcomes indicate that adult male and female moths employ different strategies for allocation and oxidation of dietary AAs.


Files in this item

Thumbnail
Name:
2743.full.pdf
Size:
369.1Kb
Format:
PDF
Description:
FInal Published Version

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record