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dc.contributor.authorGiven, BarbaraAen
dc.contributor.authorGiven, CharlesWen
dc.contributor.authorSikorskii, Allaen
dc.contributor.authorVachon, Ericen
dc.contributor.authorBanik, Asishen
dc.date.accessioned2017-09-14T21:40:11Z
dc.date.available2017-09-14T21:40:11Z
dc.date.issued2017
dc.identifier.citationMedication burden of treatment using oral cancer medications 2017, 4 (4):275 Asia-Pacific Journal of Oncology Nursingen
dc.identifier.issn2347-5625
dc.identifier.doi10.4103/apjon.apjon_7_17
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/625510
dc.description.abstractObjective: With the changes in healthcare, patients with cancer now have to assume greater responsibility for their own care. Oral cancer medications with complex regimens are now a part of cancer treatment. Patients have to manage these along with the management of medications for their other chronic illnesses. This results in medication burden as patients assume the self-management. Methods: This paper describes the treatment burdens that patients endured in a randomized, clinical trial examining adherence for patients on oral cancer medications. There were four categories of oral agents reported. Most of the diagnoses of the patients were solid tumors with breast, colorectal, renal, and gastrointestinal. Results: Patients had 1u4 pills/day for oral cancer medications as well as a number for comorbidity conditions (3), for which they also took medications (10u11). In addition, patients had 3.7u5.9 symptoms and side effects. Patients on all categories except those on sex hormones had 49%u57% drug interruptions necessitating further medication burden. Conclusions: This study points out that patients taking oral agents have multiple medications for cancer and other comorbid conditions. The number of pills, times per day, and interruptions adds to the medication burden that patients' experience. Further study is needed to determine strategies to assist the patients on oral cancer medications to reduce their medication burden.
dc.description.sponsorshipNational Cancer Institute, an institute of the National Institutes of Health [1R01CA162401-01A1. 2013-2017]en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherMEDKNOW PUBLICATIONS & MEDIA PVT LTDen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.apjon.org/text.asp?2017/4/4/275/212866en
dc.rights© 2017 Ann & Joshua Medical Publishing Co. Ltd | Published by Wolters Kluwer - Medknow. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 License.en
dc.subjectBurden of treatmenten
dc.subjectcanceren
dc.subjectcomorbidityen
dc.subjectoral cancer medicationen
dc.titleMedication burden of treatment using oral cancer medicationsen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniv Arizona, Coll Nursingen
dc.identifier.journalAsia-Pacific Journal of Oncology Nursingen
dc.description.noteOpen access journal.en
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item from the UA Faculty Publications collection is made available by the University of Arizona with support from the University of Arizona Libraries. If you have questions, please contact us at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.en
dc.eprint.versionFinal published versionen
refterms.dateFOA2018-06-27T23:29:44Z
html.description.abstractObjective: With the changes in healthcare, patients with cancer now have to assume greater responsibility for their own care. Oral cancer medications with complex regimens are now a part of cancer treatment. Patients have to manage these along with the management of medications for their other chronic illnesses. This results in medication burden as patients assume the self-management. Methods: This paper describes the treatment burdens that patients endured in a randomized, clinical trial examining adherence for patients on oral cancer medications. There were four categories of oral agents reported. Most of the diagnoses of the patients were solid tumors with breast, colorectal, renal, and gastrointestinal. Results: Patients had 1u4 pills/day for oral cancer medications as well as a number for comorbidity conditions (3), for which they also took medications (10u11). In addition, patients had 3.7u5.9 symptoms and side effects. Patients on all categories except those on sex hormones had 49%u57% drug interruptions necessitating further medication burden. Conclusions: This study points out that patients taking oral agents have multiple medications for cancer and other comorbid conditions. The number of pills, times per day, and interruptions adds to the medication burden that patients' experience. Further study is needed to determine strategies to assist the patients on oral cancer medications to reduce their medication burden.


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