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dc.contributor.advisorSulkowski, Michael L.en
dc.contributor.authorLoomis, Natalie
dc.creatorLoomis, Natalieen
dc.date.accessioned2017-09-15T21:26:41Z
dc.date.available2017-09-15T21:26:41Z
dc.date.issued2017
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/625557
dc.description.abstractThere has been extensive research on the negative outcomes experienced by homeless youth and the protective role social support plays in typical adolescent development. However, current gaps in the literature are found in regard to potential protective factors for homeless youth, showing a need for further research to examine such possible influencers as social support. Homeless youth are a vulnerable population that live in social and residential instability during a critical time of development. It is imperative that research explores the elements that could serve as potential protective factors to foster resilience and healthy adolescent development for these youths. The current study sought to explore social support as a potential protective factor for homeless youth. By utilizing a social support framework, this study researched the relationships between homeless living status (e.g., living with a relative, non-relative, or no permanent home or caregiver), teacher social support, peer social support, academic achievement and psychosocial distress. This study found that teacher social support had a direct effect on the psychosocial functioning of homeless students. This indicates that higher levels of teacher social support perceived by homeless students within the school environment may have a positive impact on these students' psychosocial outcomes and overall well-being. Limitations and implications of the current study are discussed.
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en
dc.subjectAdolescenten
dc.subjectHomeless Living Statusen
dc.subjectHomeless Youthen
dc.subjectPsychosocial Functioningen
dc.subjectSocial Supporten
dc.subjectTeacheren
dc.titleThe Impact of Social Support from Teachers on the Psychosocial Functioning of Homeless Youthen_US
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen
dc.contributor.committeememberSulkowski, Michael L.en
dc.contributor.committeememberKirkpatrick, Jenniferen
dc.contributor.committeememberThompson, Kristinen
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen
thesis.degree.disciplineSchool Psychologyen
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en
refterms.dateFOA2018-09-11T22:49:26Z
html.description.abstractThere has been extensive research on the negative outcomes experienced by homeless youth and the protective role social support plays in typical adolescent development. However, current gaps in the literature are found in regard to potential protective factors for homeless youth, showing a need for further research to examine such possible influencers as social support. Homeless youth are a vulnerable population that live in social and residential instability during a critical time of development. It is imperative that research explores the elements that could serve as potential protective factors to foster resilience and healthy adolescent development for these youths. The current study sought to explore social support as a potential protective factor for homeless youth. By utilizing a social support framework, this study researched the relationships between homeless living status (e.g., living with a relative, non-relative, or no permanent home or caregiver), teacher social support, peer social support, academic achievement and psychosocial distress. This study found that teacher social support had a direct effect on the psychosocial functioning of homeless students. This indicates that higher levels of teacher social support perceived by homeless students within the school environment may have a positive impact on these students' psychosocial outcomes and overall well-being. Limitations and implications of the current study are discussed.


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