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dc.contributor.advisorRigney, Ted S.en
dc.contributor.authorWinston, Mariana Ehlrich
dc.creatorWinston, Mariana Ehlrichen
dc.date.accessioned2017-09-25T18:35:09Z
dc.date.available2017-09-25T18:35:09Z
dc.date.issued2017
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/625615
dc.description.abstractBackground: Bullying is a form of violence and is described as unwelcome aggressive behavior(s) by unrelated individuals. The prevalence of bullying in the nursing profession has been reported to be as high as 31% in the United States, and has been studied extensively in undergraduate nursing, midwifery, medical school residencies, and Certified Registered Nurse Anesthesia (CRNA) professional roles. There is a significant gap in the literature and paucity of evidence about the extent of Student Registered Nurse Anesthesia (SRNA) bullying underscored that this topic required further investigation. Purpose: To investigate whether bullying behaviors occur among anesthesia preceptors, and if so, how SRNAs perceive bullying has affected their educational experience. Methods: The American Association of Nurse Anesthetists (AANA) disseminated an online survey based on an existing tool to SRNAs for this study. The study used a quantitative descriptive methodology consisting of a survey of nine demographic questions, eight 5-point Likert scale questions, and two multiple-choice questions. Setting and sample: A nationwide online survey sent to 1500 SRNAs yielded (N=133) participants, who were predominantly female (67.67%), in front-loaded programs (52.63%) with an average age of 24-29 years old. Results: Results revealed SRNAs entering clinical rotations in 2015 and 2016 were bullied more than those entering in 2017. The majority of the respondents (89.26%) reported that they couldn't think clearly when they were bullied. More than half of SRNAs agreed (74.62%) that bullying impedes learning. Overall, CRNA preceptors (85.48%) were reported as the most frequent bullies, with MD/DO anesthesiologists reported as the second most frequent (68.55%) followed by non-CRNA nursing staff (41.94%).
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en
dc.subjectaggressionen
dc.subjectbelittlementen
dc.subjectbullyingen
dc.subjectharassmenten
dc.subjectlateral violenceen
dc.subjectStudent registered nurse anesthetisten
dc.titleStudent Registered Nurse Anesthetists' Perceptions of Bullying and its Impact on Learningen_US
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen
dc.contributor.committeememberRigney, Ted S.en
dc.contributor.committeememberTorabi, Sarah A.en
dc.contributor.committeememberPiotrowski, Kathleen A.en
dc.description.releaseRelease after 02-Feb-2018en
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen
thesis.degree.disciplineNursingen
thesis.degree.nameD.N.P.en
refterms.dateFOA2018-02-02T00:00:00Z
html.description.abstractBackground: Bullying is a form of violence and is described as unwelcome aggressive behavior(s) by unrelated individuals. The prevalence of bullying in the nursing profession has been reported to be as high as 31% in the United States, and has been studied extensively in undergraduate nursing, midwifery, medical school residencies, and Certified Registered Nurse Anesthesia (CRNA) professional roles. There is a significant gap in the literature and paucity of evidence about the extent of Student Registered Nurse Anesthesia (SRNA) bullying underscored that this topic required further investigation. Purpose: To investigate whether bullying behaviors occur among anesthesia preceptors, and if so, how SRNAs perceive bullying has affected their educational experience. Methods: The American Association of Nurse Anesthetists (AANA) disseminated an online survey based on an existing tool to SRNAs for this study. The study used a quantitative descriptive methodology consisting of a survey of nine demographic questions, eight 5-point Likert scale questions, and two multiple-choice questions. Setting and sample: A nationwide online survey sent to 1500 SRNAs yielded (N=133) participants, who were predominantly female (67.67%), in front-loaded programs (52.63%) with an average age of 24-29 years old. Results: Results revealed SRNAs entering clinical rotations in 2015 and 2016 were bullied more than those entering in 2017. The majority of the respondents (89.26%) reported that they couldn't think clearly when they were bullied. More than half of SRNAs agreed (74.62%) that bullying impedes learning. Overall, CRNA preceptors (85.48%) were reported as the most frequent bullies, with MD/DO anesthesiologists reported as the second most frequent (68.55%) followed by non-CRNA nursing staff (41.94%).


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