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dc.contributor.authorKellogg, Kendra
dc.contributor.authorMetchev, Stanimir A.
dc.contributor.authorMiles-Páez, Paulo A.
dc.contributor.authorTannock, Megan E.
dc.date.accessioned2017-10-02T21:55:09Z
dc.date.available2017-10-02T21:55:09Z
dc.date.issued2017-08-29
dc.identifier.citationA Statistical Survey of Peculiar L and T Dwarfs in SDSS, 2MASS, and WISE 2017, 154 (3):112 The Astronomical Journalen
dc.identifier.issn1538-3881
dc.identifier.doi10.3847/1538-3881/aa83b0
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/625747
dc.description.abstractWe present the final results from a targeted search for brown dwarfs with unusual near-infrared colors. From a positional cross-match of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), 2-Micron All-Sky Survey (2MASS), and Wide-Field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) catalogs, we have identified 144 candidate peculiar L and T dwarfs. Spectroscopy confirms that 20 of the objects are peculiar or are candidate binaries. Of the 420 objects in our full sample 9 are young (less than or similar to 200 Myr; 2.1%) and another 8 (1.9%) are unusually red, with no signatures of youth. With a spectroscopic J-K-s color of 2.58 +/- 0.11 mag, one of the new objects, the L6 dwarf 2MASS J03530419 +0418193, is among the reddest field dwarfs currently known and is one of the reddest objects with no signatures of youth known to date. We have also discovered another potentially very-low-gravity object, the L1 dwarf 2MASS J00133470+1109403, and independently identified the young L7 dwarf 2MASS J00440332+0228112, which was first reported by Schneider and collaborators. Our results confirm that signatures of low gravity are no longer discernible in low to moderate resolution spectra of objects older than similar to 200 Myr. The 1.9% of unusually red L dwarfs that do not show other signatures of youth could be slightly older, up to similar to 400 Myr. In this case a red J - K-s color may be more diagnostic of moderate youth than individual spectral features. However, its is also possible that these objects are relatively metal-rich, and thus have enhanced atmospheric dust content.
dc.description.sponsorshipNASA Astrophysical Data Analysis Program [NNX11AB18G]; NSERC Discovery grant; National Science Foundation; National Aeronautics and Space Administration; Alfred P. Sloan Foundation; U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science; [GN-2015A-Q-57]; [GN-2015B-Q-79]; [GN-2017A-Q-44]en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherIOP PUBLISHING LTDen
dc.relation.urlhttp://stacks.iop.org/1538-3881/154/i=3/a=112?key=crossref.c067f9730ee21b6a2a77cc8c68f8f465en
dc.rights© 2017. The American Astronomical Society. All rights reserved.en
dc.subjectbinaries: closeen
dc.subjectbrown dwarfsen
dc.subjectinfrared: starsen
dc.subjectstars: individual (2MASS J03530419+0418193)en
dc.subjectstars: late-typeen
dc.subjectstars: peculiaren
dc.titleA Statistical Survey of Peculiar L and T Dwarfs in SDSS, 2MASS, and WISEen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniv Arizona, Dept Astron & Steward Observen
dc.identifier.journalThe Astronomical Journalen
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item from the UA Faculty Publications collection is made available by the University of Arizona with support from the University of Arizona Libraries. If you have questions, please contact us at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.en
dc.eprint.versionFinal published versionen
refterms.dateFOA2018-08-19T03:20:17Z
html.description.abstractWe present the final results from a targeted search for brown dwarfs with unusual near-infrared colors. From a positional cross-match of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), 2-Micron All-Sky Survey (2MASS), and Wide-Field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) catalogs, we have identified 144 candidate peculiar L and T dwarfs. Spectroscopy confirms that 20 of the objects are peculiar or are candidate binaries. Of the 420 objects in our full sample 9 are young (less than or similar to 200 Myr; 2.1%) and another 8 (1.9%) are unusually red, with no signatures of youth. With a spectroscopic J-K-s color of 2.58 +/- 0.11 mag, one of the new objects, the L6 dwarf 2MASS J03530419 +0418193, is among the reddest field dwarfs currently known and is one of the reddest objects with no signatures of youth known to date. We have also discovered another potentially very-low-gravity object, the L1 dwarf 2MASS J00133470+1109403, and independently identified the young L7 dwarf 2MASS J00440332+0228112, which was first reported by Schneider and collaborators. Our results confirm that signatures of low gravity are no longer discernible in low to moderate resolution spectra of objects older than similar to 200 Myr. The 1.9% of unusually red L dwarfs that do not show other signatures of youth could be slightly older, up to similar to 400 Myr. In this case a red J - K-s color may be more diagnostic of moderate youth than individual spectral features. However, its is also possible that these objects are relatively metal-rich, and thus have enhanced atmospheric dust content.


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