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dc.contributor.authorO’Connor, Teresia M.
dc.contributor.authorMâsse, Louise C.
dc.contributor.authorTu, Andrew W.
dc.contributor.authorWatts, Allison W.
dc.contributor.authorHughes, Sheryl O.
dc.contributor.authorBeauchamp, Mark R.
dc.contributor.authorBaranowski, Tom
dc.contributor.authorPham, Truc
dc.contributor.authorBerge, Jerica M.
dc.contributor.authorFiese, Barbara
dc.contributor.authorGolley, Rebecca
dc.contributor.authorHingle, Melanie
dc.contributor.authorKremers, Stef P. J.
dc.contributor.authorRhee, Kyung E.
dc.contributor.authorSkouteris, Helen
dc.contributor.authorVaughn, Amber
dc.date.accessioned2017-10-06T19:21:23Z
dc.date.available2017-10-06T19:21:23Z
dc.date.issued2017-09-11
dc.identifier.citationFood parenting practices for 5 to 12 year old children: a concept map analysis of parenting and nutrition experts input 2017, 14 (1) International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activityen
dc.identifier.issn1479-5868
dc.identifier.pmid28893273
dc.identifier.doi10.1186/s12966-017-0572-1
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/625794
dc.description.abstractBackground: Parents are an important influence on children's dietary intake and eating behaviors. However, the lack of a conceptual framework and inconsistent assessment of food parenting practices limits our understanding of which food parenting practices are most influential on children. The aim of this study was to develop a food parenting practice conceptual framework using systematic approaches of literature reviews and expert input. Method: A previously completed systematic review of food parenting practice instruments and a qualitative study of parents informed the development of a food parenting practice item bank consisting of 3632 food parenting practice items. The original item bank was further reduced to 110 key food parenting concepts using binning and winnowing techniques. A panel of 32 experts in parenting and nutrition were invited to sort the food parenting practice concepts into categories that reflected their perceptions of a food parenting practice conceptual framework. Multi-dimensional scaling produced a point map of the sorted concepts and hierarchical cluster analysis identified potential solutions. Subjective modifications were used to identify two potential solutions, with additional feedback from the expert panel requested. Results: The experts came from 8 countries and 25 participated in the sorting and 23 provided additional feedback. A parsimonious and a comprehensive concept map were developed based on the clustering of the food parenting practice constructs. The parsimonious concept map contained 7 constructs, while the comprehensive concept map contained 17 constructs and was informed by a previously published content map for food parenting practices. Most of the experts (52%) preferred the comprehensive concept map, while 35% preferred to present both solutions. Conclusion: The comprehensive food parenting practice conceptual map will provide the basis for developing a calibrated Item Response Modeling (IRM) item bank that can be used with computerized adaptive testing. Such an item bank will allow for more consistency in measuring food parenting practices across studies to better assess the impact of food parenting practices on child outcomes and the effect of interventions that target parents as agents of change.
dc.description.sponsorshipCanadian Institute of Health Research (CIHR) [MOP-119359]; BC Child's Hospital Research Institute (BCCHRI); Michael Smith Foundation for Health Research; USDA/ARS [58-3092-5-001]en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherBIOMED CENTRAL LTDen
dc.relation.urlhttp://ijbnpa.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s12966-017-0572-1en
dc.rights© The Author(s). 2017 Open Access This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.en
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.subjectFooden
dc.subjectNutritionen
dc.subjectChilden
dc.subjectParentingen
dc.subjectParenting practicesen
dc.subjectFamilyen
dc.subjectConcept mappingen
dc.subjectMeasurementen
dc.titleFood parenting practices for 5 to 12 year old children: a concept map analysis of parenting and nutrition experts inputen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniv Arizona, Coll Agr & Life Scien
dc.identifier.journalInternational Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activityen
dc.description.noteOpen Access Journalen
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item from the UA Faculty Publications collection is made available by the University of Arizona with support from the University of Arizona Libraries. If you have questions, please contact us at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.en
dc.eprint.versionFinal published versionen
refterms.dateFOA2018-07-14T22:05:47Z
html.description.abstractBackground: Parents are an important influence on children's dietary intake and eating behaviors. However, the lack of a conceptual framework and inconsistent assessment of food parenting practices limits our understanding of which food parenting practices are most influential on children. The aim of this study was to develop a food parenting practice conceptual framework using systematic approaches of literature reviews and expert input. Method: A previously completed systematic review of food parenting practice instruments and a qualitative study of parents informed the development of a food parenting practice item bank consisting of 3632 food parenting practice items. The original item bank was further reduced to 110 key food parenting concepts using binning and winnowing techniques. A panel of 32 experts in parenting and nutrition were invited to sort the food parenting practice concepts into categories that reflected their perceptions of a food parenting practice conceptual framework. Multi-dimensional scaling produced a point map of the sorted concepts and hierarchical cluster analysis identified potential solutions. Subjective modifications were used to identify two potential solutions, with additional feedback from the expert panel requested. Results: The experts came from 8 countries and 25 participated in the sorting and 23 provided additional feedback. A parsimonious and a comprehensive concept map were developed based on the clustering of the food parenting practice constructs. The parsimonious concept map contained 7 constructs, while the comprehensive concept map contained 17 constructs and was informed by a previously published content map for food parenting practices. Most of the experts (52%) preferred the comprehensive concept map, while 35% preferred to present both solutions. Conclusion: The comprehensive food parenting practice conceptual map will provide the basis for developing a calibrated Item Response Modeling (IRM) item bank that can be used with computerized adaptive testing. Such an item bank will allow for more consistency in measuring food parenting practices across studies to better assess the impact of food parenting practices on child outcomes and the effect of interventions that target parents as agents of change.


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© The Author(s). 2017 Open Access This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as © The Author(s). 2017 Open Access This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.