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dc.contributor.authorHuang, Hekunen
dc.contributor.authorHua, Hongen
dc.date.accessioned2017-10-09T22:18:08Z
dc.date.available2017-10-09T22:18:08Z
dc.date.issued2017-07-24
dc.identifier.citationSystematic characterization and optimization of 3D light field displays 2017, 25 (16):18508 Optics Expressen
dc.identifier.issn1094-4087
dc.identifier.doi10.1364/OE.25.018508
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/625824
dc.description.abstractOne of the key issues in conventional stereoscopic displays is the well-known vergence-accommodation conflict problem due to the lack of the ability to render correct focus cues for 3D scenes. Recently several light field display methods have been explored to reconstruct a true 3D scene by sampling either the projections of the 3D scene at different depths or the directions of the light rays apparently emitted by the 3D scene and viewed from different eye positions. These methods are potentially capable of rendering correct or nearly correct focus cues and addressing the vergence-accommodation conflict problem. In this paper, we describe a generalized framework to model the image formation process of the existing light-field display methods and present a systematic method to simulate and characterize the retinal image and the accommodation response rendered by a light field display. We further employ this framework to investigate the trade-offs and guidelines for an optimal 3D light field display design. Our method is based on quantitatively evaluating the modulation transfer functions of the perceived retinal image of a light field display by accounting for the ocular factors of the human visual system. (C) 2017 Optical Society of America
dc.description.sponsorshipNational Science Foundation [14-22653]; Google Faculty Research Awarden
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherOPTICAL SOC AMERen
dc.relation.urlhttps://www.osapublishing.org/abstract.cfm?URI=oe-25-16-18508en
dc.rights© 2017 Optical Society of Americaen
dc.titleSystematic characterization and optimization of 3D light field displaysen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniv Arizona, Visualizat & Imaging Syst Lab 3D, Coll Opt Scien
dc.identifier.journalOptics Expressen
dc.description.noteOpen access journal.en
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item from the UA Faculty Publications collection is made available by the University of Arizona with support from the University of Arizona Libraries. If you have questions, please contact us at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.en
dc.eprint.versionFinal published versionen
refterms.dateFOA2018-07-17T17:26:47Z
html.description.abstractOne of the key issues in conventional stereoscopic displays is the well-known vergence-accommodation conflict problem due to the lack of the ability to render correct focus cues for 3D scenes. Recently several light field display methods have been explored to reconstruct a true 3D scene by sampling either the projections of the 3D scene at different depths or the directions of the light rays apparently emitted by the 3D scene and viewed from different eye positions. These methods are potentially capable of rendering correct or nearly correct focus cues and addressing the vergence-accommodation conflict problem. In this paper, we describe a generalized framework to model the image formation process of the existing light-field display methods and present a systematic method to simulate and characterize the retinal image and the accommodation response rendered by a light field display. We further employ this framework to investigate the trade-offs and guidelines for an optimal 3D light field display design. Our method is based on quantitatively evaluating the modulation transfer functions of the perceived retinal image of a light field display by accounting for the ocular factors of the human visual system. (C) 2017 Optical Society of America


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