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dc.contributor.authorMajeed, Aneela
dc.contributor.authorChan, Onyee
dc.contributor.authorOkolo, Onyemaechi
dc.contributor.authorShponka, Volodymyr
dc.contributor.authorGeorgescu, Anca
dc.contributor.authorPersky, Daniel
dc.date.accessioned2017-10-09T23:23:43Z
dc.date.available2017-10-09T23:23:43Z
dc.date.issued2017-06-20
dc.identifier.citationHodgkin Lymphoma Mimicking Osteomyelitis 2017, 10 (2):542 Case Reports in Oncologyen
dc.identifier.issn1662-6575
dc.identifier.pmid28690530
dc.identifier.doi10.1159/000474938
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/625840
dc.description.abstractHodgkin lymphoma with symptomatic osseous involvement can have a similar presentation to osteomyelitis. Common findings in symptoms, laboratory workup, and imaging can make it very difficult to distinguish between the two diseases. Excisional biopsy should be pursued if fine-needle biopsy is equivocal and suspicion of lymphoma is high. We report a case of a 40-year-old man who presented with a history of marine animal sting on his neck and later developed erythema in the area, chest pain, constitutional symptoms, adenopathy, and imaging classic for sternal osteomyelitis. Fortunately, initial biopsy prompted the possibility of lymphoma, and further workup was initiated, which confirmed Hodgkin lymphoma. This case is a good reminder that malignancies and infections can share many common features, and keeping a broad differential diagnosis can be lifesaving. Proper staging and risk stratification of Hodgkin lymphoma help determine the optimal treatment. (C) 2017 The Author(s) Published by S. Karger AG, Basel
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherKARGERen
dc.relation.urlhttps://www.karger.com/?doi=10.1159/000474938en
dc.rights© 2017 The Author(s). This article is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License (CC BY-NC).en
dc.subjectHodgkin lymphomaen
dc.subjectLymphomaen
dc.subjectOsteomyelitisen
dc.subjectOsseous Hodgkin lymphomaen
dc.titleHodgkin Lymphoma Mimicking Osteomyelitisen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniv Arizona, Banner Univ, Med Ctr, Dept Infect Disen
dc.contributor.departmentUniv Arizona, Banner Univ, Med Ctr, Dept Meden
dc.contributor.departmentUniv Arizona, Banner Univ, Med Ctr, Dept Patholen
dc.contributor.departmentUniv Arizona, Banner Univ, Med Ctr, Dept Hematol Oncolen
dc.identifier.journalCase Reports in Oncologyen
dc.description.noteOpen Access Journal.en
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item from the UA Faculty Publications collection is made available by the University of Arizona with support from the University of Arizona Libraries. If you have questions, please contact us at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.en
dc.eprint.versionFinal published versionen
refterms.dateFOA2018-05-27T15:01:16Z
html.description.abstractHodgkin lymphoma with symptomatic osseous involvement can have a similar presentation to osteomyelitis. Common findings in symptoms, laboratory workup, and imaging can make it very difficult to distinguish between the two diseases. Excisional biopsy should be pursued if fine-needle biopsy is equivocal and suspicion of lymphoma is high. We report a case of a 40-year-old man who presented with a history of marine animal sting on his neck and later developed erythema in the area, chest pain, constitutional symptoms, adenopathy, and imaging classic for sternal osteomyelitis. Fortunately, initial biopsy prompted the possibility of lymphoma, and further workup was initiated, which confirmed Hodgkin lymphoma. This case is a good reminder that malignancies and infections can share many common features, and keeping a broad differential diagnosis can be lifesaving. Proper staging and risk stratification of Hodgkin lymphoma help determine the optimal treatment. (C) 2017 The Author(s) Published by S. Karger AG, Basel


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