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dc.contributor.advisorClift, Renée T.en
dc.contributor.authorRobbins, Sheri*
dc.creatorRobbins, Sherien
dc.date.accessioned2017-10-12T00:26:28Z
dc.date.available2017-10-12T00:26:28Z
dc.date.issued2017
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/625843
dc.description.abstractThis study followed two teacher candidates from the Communities as Resources in Early Childhood Teacher Education (CREATE) project into their first year classrooms to determine whether they were able to translate the theoretical principles from their teacher preparation program into practice during their first year of teaching. It also examined the supporting and limiting contextual factors that affected translation both during their teacher preparation and in their first year of teaching. Multiple case study methodology was used to look closely at each case independently providing consistency through replication, while also allowing the ability to look across both cases to develop more powerful findings (Stake, 2006; Baxter & Jack, 2008; Yin, 2014). A conceptual frame was developed around translation, revisiting how it has been used in other fields of research in the past (Catford, 1974; Bassnett, 2013; Major & Cordey-Hayes, 2000; Holden & Von Kortzfleisch, 2004; Jacobson, Butterill & Goering, 2003; Davison, 2009; Straus, Tetroe, & Graham, 2009) and how it is currently being used as a metaphor in the field of education (Cook-Sather, 2001, 2006) to provide a lens into the intricacies and flexibility of the process of translation. Literature was reviewed to provide background into research that has looked closely at the impact teacher preparation programs have on the first year of teaching, and to provide background information into the conceptualization of the work undergirding the principles of CREATE. It is crucial for teacher preparation programs to follow their own graduates into their classrooms to gain a deeper understanding of what concepts, theories, and principles translated from university classrooms and field experiences to practice in first year teacher's classrooms, in order to make changes to their teacher education curriculum to prevent a breakdown of translation. This study offers insight into what supports and limits translation and offers suggestions for future research in the area of translation.
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en
dc.subjectfirst year teachersen
dc.subjectteacher candidatesen
dc.subjectteacher preparationen
dc.subjecttranslationen
dc.titleTranslating Theoretical Principles to Classroom Practiceen_US
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen
dc.contributor.committeememberClift, Renée T.en
dc.contributor.committeememberShort, Kathy G.en
dc.contributor.committeememberda Silva Iddings, Ana Christinaen
dc.contributor.committeememberJurich, Donna L.en
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen
thesis.degree.disciplineLanguage, Reading & Cultureen
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en
refterms.dateFOA2018-06-15T05:47:40Z
html.description.abstractThis study followed two teacher candidates from the Communities as Resources in Early Childhood Teacher Education (CREATE) project into their first year classrooms to determine whether they were able to translate the theoretical principles from their teacher preparation program into practice during their first year of teaching. It also examined the supporting and limiting contextual factors that affected translation both during their teacher preparation and in their first year of teaching. Multiple case study methodology was used to look closely at each case independently providing consistency through replication, while also allowing the ability to look across both cases to develop more powerful findings (Stake, 2006; Baxter & Jack, 2008; Yin, 2014). A conceptual frame was developed around translation, revisiting how it has been used in other fields of research in the past (Catford, 1974; Bassnett, 2013; Major & Cordey-Hayes, 2000; Holden & Von Kortzfleisch, 2004; Jacobson, Butterill & Goering, 2003; Davison, 2009; Straus, Tetroe, & Graham, 2009) and how it is currently being used as a metaphor in the field of education (Cook-Sather, 2001, 2006) to provide a lens into the intricacies and flexibility of the process of translation. Literature was reviewed to provide background into research that has looked closely at the impact teacher preparation programs have on the first year of teaching, and to provide background information into the conceptualization of the work undergirding the principles of CREATE. It is crucial for teacher preparation programs to follow their own graduates into their classrooms to gain a deeper understanding of what concepts, theories, and principles translated from university classrooms and field experiences to practice in first year teacher's classrooms, in order to make changes to their teacher education curriculum to prevent a breakdown of translation. This study offers insight into what supports and limits translation and offers suggestions for future research in the area of translation.


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