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dc.contributor.advisorWygnanski, Israelen
dc.contributor.authorJentzsch, Marvin Patrick
dc.creatorJentzsch, Marvin Patricken
dc.date.accessioned2017-10-18T18:07:55Z
dc.date.available2017-10-18T18:07:55Z
dc.date.issued2017
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/625917
dc.description.abstractThe Stability And Control CONfiguration (SACCON) model represents an emerging trend in airplane design where the classical tube, wing and empennage are replaced by a single tailless configuration. The challenge is to assure that these designs are stable and controllable. Nonlinear aerodynamic behavior is observed on the SACCON at higher incidence angles due to leading edge vortex structures. Active Flow Control (AFC) used in preliminary design represents a promising solution to the longitudinal stability problems and this was demonstrated experimentally on a semi span model. AFC can be used to trim the SACCON in pitch and it alters forces and moments comparable to common control surface deflections. A combination of AFC and control surface deflection may increase the overall efficiency and opens up a variety of maneuvering possibilities. This implies that AFC should be treated concomitantly with other design parameters and should be considered in the preliminary design process already and not as an add-on tool. Integral force and moment data was supplemented by observations using Pressure Sensitive Paint (PSP) and flow visualization. Two arrays of individually controlled sweeping jets, one located along the leading edge and the other along the flap hinge provided the AFC input needed to alter the flow. The array positioned over the flap-hinge of the model was most effective in stabilizing the wing by decreasing the pitching moment at lower and intermediate angles of incidence. This effect was achieved by reducing the spanwise flow on the swept back portion of the wing through jet-entrainment that also affected the leading edge vortex. Leading edge actuation showed some beneficial effects by inhibiting the formation of the leading edge vortex near the wing tip. A preliminary study using suction was carried out. The tests were carried out at Mach numbers smaller than 0.2 and Reynolds numbers based on the root chord of the model that approached 10⁶.
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en
dc.subjectActive Flow Controlen
dc.subjectOscillating Jeten
dc.subjectSACCONen
dc.subjectSweeping Jeten
dc.subjectTailles Aircraften
dc.subjectTrimen
dc.titleOn the Use of Active Flow Control to Trim and Control a Tailles Aircraft Modelen_US
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen
thesis.degree.levelmastersen
dc.contributor.committeememberWygnanski, Israelen
dc.contributor.committeememberTumin, Anatolien
dc.contributor.committeememberLittle, Jesseen
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen
thesis.degree.disciplineAerospace Engineeringen
thesis.degree.nameM.S.en
refterms.dateFOA2018-08-19T10:48:57Z
html.description.abstractThe Stability And Control CONfiguration (SACCON) model represents an emerging trend in airplane design where the classical tube, wing and empennage are replaced by a single tailless configuration. The challenge is to assure that these designs are stable and controllable. Nonlinear aerodynamic behavior is observed on the SACCON at higher incidence angles due to leading edge vortex structures. Active Flow Control (AFC) used in preliminary design represents a promising solution to the longitudinal stability problems and this was demonstrated experimentally on a semi span model. AFC can be used to trim the SACCON in pitch and it alters forces and moments comparable to common control surface deflections. A combination of AFC and control surface deflection may increase the overall efficiency and opens up a variety of maneuvering possibilities. This implies that AFC should be treated concomitantly with other design parameters and should be considered in the preliminary design process already and not as an add-on tool. Integral force and moment data was supplemented by observations using Pressure Sensitive Paint (PSP) and flow visualization. Two arrays of individually controlled sweeping jets, one located along the leading edge and the other along the flap hinge provided the AFC input needed to alter the flow. The array positioned over the flap-hinge of the model was most effective in stabilizing the wing by decreasing the pitching moment at lower and intermediate angles of incidence. This effect was achieved by reducing the spanwise flow on the swept back portion of the wing through jet-entrainment that also affected the leading edge vortex. Leading edge actuation showed some beneficial effects by inhibiting the formation of the leading edge vortex near the wing tip. A preliminary study using suction was carried out. The tests were carried out at Mach numbers smaller than 0.2 and Reynolds numbers based on the root chord of the model that approached 10⁶.


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