Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorMahalanobis, Abhijit
dc.contributor.authorShilling, Richard
dc.contributor.authorMuise, Robert
dc.contributor.authorNeifeld, Mark
dc.date.accessioned2017-11-06T23:41:15Z
dc.date.available2017-11-06T23:41:15Z
dc.date.issued2017-08-22
dc.identifier.citationHigh-resolution imaging using a translating coded aperture 2017, 56 (08):1 Optical Engineeringen
dc.identifier.issn0091-3286
dc.identifier.doi10.1117/1.OE.56.8.084106
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/626004
dc.description.abstractIt is well known that a translating mask can optically encode low-resolution measurements from which higher resolution images can be computationally reconstructed. We experimentally demonstrate that this principle can be used to achieve substantial increase in image resolution compared to the size of the focal plane array (FPA). Specifically, we describe a scalable architecture with a translating mask (also referred to as a coded aperture) that achieves eightfold resolution improvement (or 64: 1 increase in the number of pixels compared to the number of focal plane detector elements). The imaging architecture is described in terms of general design parameters (such as field of view and angular resolution, dimensions of the mask, and the detector and FPA sizes), and some of the underlying design trades are discussed. Experiments conducted with different mask patterns and reconstruction algorithms illustrate how these parameters affect the resolution of the reconstructed image. Initial experimental results also demonstrate that the architecture can directly support task-specific information sensing for detection and tracking, and that moving objects can be reconstructed separately from the stationary background using motion priors. (C) 2017 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE)
dc.description.sponsorshipOffice of Naval Research (ONR); MONITOR [N00014-14-C-0173]en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherSPIE-SOC PHOTO-OPTICAL INSTRUMENTATION ENGINEERSen
dc.relation.urlhttps://www.spiedigitallibrary.org/journals/optical-engineering/volume-56/issue-08/084106/High-resolution-imaging-using-a-translating-coded-aperture/10.1117/1.OE.56.8.084106.fullen
dc.rights© 2017 SPIE.en
dc.rights.urihttp://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/
dc.subjectcomputational imagingen
dc.subjectcoded apertureen
dc.subjectdigital super resolutionen
dc.subjecttask specific imagingen
dc.titleHigh-resolution imaging using a translating coded apertureen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniv Arizona, Dept Elect & Comp Engnen
dc.identifier.journalOptical Engineeringen
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item from the UA Faculty Publications collection is made available by the University of Arizona with support from the University of Arizona Libraries. If you have questions, please contact us at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.en
dc.eprint.versionFinal published versionen
dc.contributor.institutionLockheed Martin, Missiles and Fire Control, Orlando, Florida
dc.contributor.institutionLockheed Martin, Missiles and Fire Control, Orlando, Florida
dc.contributor.institutionLockheed Martin, Missiles and Fire Control, Orlando, Florida
dc.contributor.institutionUniversity of Arizona, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Tucson, Arizona
refterms.dateFOA2018-09-11T23:57:31Z
html.description.abstractIt is well known that a translating mask can optically encode low-resolution measurements from which higher resolution images can be computationally reconstructed. We experimentally demonstrate that this principle can be used to achieve substantial increase in image resolution compared to the size of the focal plane array (FPA). Specifically, we describe a scalable architecture with a translating mask (also referred to as a coded aperture) that achieves eightfold resolution improvement (or 64: 1 increase in the number of pixels compared to the number of focal plane detector elements). The imaging architecture is described in terms of general design parameters (such as field of view and angular resolution, dimensions of the mask, and the detector and FPA sizes), and some of the underlying design trades are discussed. Experiments conducted with different mask patterns and reconstruction algorithms illustrate how these parameters affect the resolution of the reconstructed image. Initial experimental results also demonstrate that the architecture can directly support task-specific information sensing for detection and tracking, and that moving objects can be reconstructed separately from the stationary background using motion priors. (C) 2017 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE)


Files in this item

Thumbnail
Name:
084106.pdf
Size:
3.633Mb
Format:
PDF
Description:
FInal Published Version

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record