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dc.contributor.authorWanigatunga, Amal A
dc.contributor.authorSourdet, Sandrine S
dc.contributor.authorLaMonte, Michael J
dc.contributor.authorWaring, Molly E
dc.contributor.authorNassir, Rami
dc.contributor.authorGarcia, Lorena
dc.contributor.authorBea, Jennifer W
dc.contributor.authorSeguin, Rebecca A
dc.contributor.authorOckene, Judith K
dc.contributor.authorSarto, Gloria E
dc.contributor.authorStefanick, Marcia L
dc.contributor.authorLimacher, Marian
dc.contributor.authorManini, Todd M
dc.date.accessioned2017-11-06T23:55:59Z
dc.date.available2017-11-06T23:55:59Z
dc.date.issued2016-06-08
dc.identifier.citationPhysical impairment and body weight history in postmenopausal women: the Women’s Health Initiative 2016, 19 (17):3169 Public Health Nutritionen
dc.identifier.issn1368-9800
dc.identifier.issn1475-2727
dc.identifier.pmid27269298
dc.identifier.doi10.1017/S1368980016001415
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/626012
dc.description.abstractObjective: To examine whether weight history and weight transitions over adult lifespan contribute to physical impairment among postmenopausal women. Design: BMI categories were calculated among postmenopausal women who reported their weight and height at age 18 years. Multiple-variable logistic regression was used to determine the association between BMI at age 18 years and BMI transitions over adulthood on severe physical impairment (SPI), defined as scoring <60 on the Physical Functioning subscale of the Rand thirty-six-item Short-Form Health Survey. Setting: Participants were part of the Women's Health Initiative Observational Study (WHI OS), where participants' health was followed over time via questionnaires and clinical assessments. Subjects: Postmenopausal women (n 76 016; mean age 635 (sd 73) years). Results: Women with overweight (BMI=250-299 kg/m(2)) or obesity (BMI = 300 kg/m(2)) at 18 years had greater odds (OR (95 % CI)) of SPI (151 (135, 169) and 214 (172, 265), respectively) than normal-weight (BMI=185-249 kg/m(2)) counterparts. Transitions from normal weight to overweight/obese or to underweight (BMI<185 kg/m(2)) were associated with greater odds of SPI (197 (184, 211) and 135 (106, 171), respectively) compared with weight stability. Shifting from underweight to overweight/obese also had increased odds of SPI (152 (111, 209)). Overweight/obese to normal BMI transitions resulted in a reduced SPI odds (052 (039, 071)). Conclusions: Higher weight history and transitions into higher weight classes were associated with higher likelihood of SPI, while transitioning into lower weight classes for those with overweight/obesity was protective among postmenopausal women.
dc.description.sponsorshipNCATS NIH HHS [KL2 TR000160, UL1 TR001453]; NCI NIH HHS [P30 CA124435]; NHLBI NIH HHS [U01 HL105268]; NIA NIH HHS [P30 AG028740, R01 AG042525]; NIAMS NIH HHS [U01 AR045583]; NIDCR NIH HHS [R03 DE022654]; WHI NIH HHS [N01 WH042109, N01WH42129]en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherCAMBRIDGE UNIV PRESSen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.journals.cambridge.org/abstract_S1368980016001415en
dc.rightsCopyright © The Authors 2016.en
dc.rights.urihttp://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/
dc.subjectBody weighten
dc.subjectWeight changeen
dc.subjectBMIen
dc.subjectPhysical impairmenten
dc.subjectPhysical functionen
dc.subjectDisabilityen
dc.titlePhysical impairment and body weight history in postmenopausal women: the Women’s Health Initiativeen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniv Arizona, Dept Nutr Scien
dc.identifier.journalPublic Health Nutritionen
dc.description.note12 month embargo; Published online: 08 June 2016en
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item from the UA Faculty Publications collection is made available by the University of Arizona with support from the University of Arizona Libraries. If you have questions, please contact us at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.en
dc.eprint.versionFinal published versionen
refterms.dateFOA2017-06-08T00:00:00Z
html.description.abstractObjective: To examine whether weight history and weight transitions over adult lifespan contribute to physical impairment among postmenopausal women. Design: BMI categories were calculated among postmenopausal women who reported their weight and height at age 18 years. Multiple-variable logistic regression was used to determine the association between BMI at age 18 years and BMI transitions over adulthood on severe physical impairment (SPI), defined as scoring <60 on the Physical Functioning subscale of the Rand thirty-six-item Short-Form Health Survey. Setting: Participants were part of the Women's Health Initiative Observational Study (WHI OS), where participants' health was followed over time via questionnaires and clinical assessments. Subjects: Postmenopausal women (n 76 016; mean age 635 (sd 73) years). Results: Women with overweight (BMI=250-299 kg/m(2)) or obesity (BMI = 300 kg/m(2)) at 18 years had greater odds (OR (95 % CI)) of SPI (151 (135, 169) and 214 (172, 265), respectively) than normal-weight (BMI=185-249 kg/m(2)) counterparts. Transitions from normal weight to overweight/obese or to underweight (BMI<185 kg/m(2)) were associated with greater odds of SPI (197 (184, 211) and 135 (106, 171), respectively) compared with weight stability. Shifting from underweight to overweight/obese also had increased odds of SPI (152 (111, 209)). Overweight/obese to normal BMI transitions resulted in a reduced SPI odds (052 (039, 071)). Conclusions: Higher weight history and transitions into higher weight classes were associated with higher likelihood of SPI, while transitioning into lower weight classes for those with overweight/obesity was protective among postmenopausal women.


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