Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorRimassa, Lorenza
dc.contributor.authorReig, Maria
dc.contributor.authorAbbadessa, Giovanni
dc.contributor.authorPeck-Radosavljevic, Markus
dc.contributor.authorHarris, William
dc.contributor.authorZagonel, Vittorina
dc.contributor.authorPastorelli, Davide
dc.contributor.authorRota Caremoli, Elena
dc.contributor.authorPorta, Camillo
dc.contributor.authorDamjanov, Nevena
dc.contributor.authorPatel, Hitendra
dc.contributor.authorDaniele, Bruno
dc.contributor.authorLamar, Maria
dc.contributor.authorSchwartz, Brian
dc.contributor.authorGoldberg, Terri
dc.contributor.authorSantoro, Armando
dc.contributor.authorBruix, Jordi
dc.date.accessioned2017-11-07T00:17:20Z
dc.date.available2017-11-07T00:17:20Z
dc.date.issued2017
dc.identifier.citationTumor biopsy and patient enrollment in clinical trials for advanced hepatocellular carcinoma 2017, 23 (13):2448 World Journal of Gastroenterologyen
dc.identifier.issn1007-9327
dc.identifier.pmid28428725
dc.identifier.doi10.3748/wjg.v23.i13.2448
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/626013
dc.description.abstractTumor biopsies may help to reliably distinguish hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) from other tumors, mostly cholangiocarcinoma as well as to identify the patient populations who most benefit from target-driven HCC treatments, in order to improve the success rate of experimental therapies. Clarifying tumor biology may also lead to identify biomarkers with prognostic role and/or enabling to predict response or resistance to therapies. Recently, clinical trials have more efficiently included biomarker endpoints and increasingly collected tumor tissue from enrolled patients. Due to their frail status and sometimes fast-progressing disease, the performance status of patients with HCC progressing on first-line therapy can deteriorate quickly, preventing their enrollment in clinical trials. However, the challenge of identifying the proper patient at the proper time can be overcome by periodic inter-department meetings involving the key specialists taking care of HCC patients, and solid networks between research centers and referring institutions. An early planned biopsy would also facilitate timely inclusion of patients in biology-driven clinical trials. Ultimately, institution of multidisciplinary teams can optimize treatment choice, biopsy timing, and quick enrollment of patients in clinical trials, before their performance status deteriorates.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherBAISHIDENG PUBLISHING GROUP INCen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.wjgnet.com/1007-9327/full/v23/i13/2448.htmen
dc.rightsCopyright ©The Author(s) 2017. Published by Baishideng Publishing Group Inc. All rights reserved. This article is an open-access article which was selected by an in-house editor and fully peer-reviewed by external reviewers. It is distributed in accordance with the Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial (CC BY-NC 4.0) license.en
dc.subjectLiver neoplasmsen
dc.subjectBiopsyen
dc.subjectBiomarkersen
dc.subjectClinical trialen
dc.subjectTumoren
dc.titleTumor biopsy and patient enrollment in clinical trials for advanced hepatocellular carcinomaen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniv Arizona, Ctr Canc, Dept Meden
dc.identifier.journalWorld Journal of Gastroenterologyen
dc.description.noteOpen Access Publication.en
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item from the UA Faculty Publications collection is made available by the University of Arizona with support from the University of Arizona Libraries. If you have questions, please contact us at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.en
dc.eprint.versionFinal published versionen
refterms.dateFOA2018-09-11T23:58:20Z
html.description.abstractTumor biopsies may help to reliably distinguish hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) from other tumors, mostly cholangiocarcinoma as well as to identify the patient populations who most benefit from target-driven HCC treatments, in order to improve the success rate of experimental therapies. Clarifying tumor biology may also lead to identify biomarkers with prognostic role and/or enabling to predict response or resistance to therapies. Recently, clinical trials have more efficiently included biomarker endpoints and increasingly collected tumor tissue from enrolled patients. Due to their frail status and sometimes fast-progressing disease, the performance status of patients with HCC progressing on first-line therapy can deteriorate quickly, preventing their enrollment in clinical trials. However, the challenge of identifying the proper patient at the proper time can be overcome by periodic inter-department meetings involving the key specialists taking care of HCC patients, and solid networks between research centers and referring institutions. An early planned biopsy would also facilitate timely inclusion of patients in biology-driven clinical trials. Ultimately, institution of multidisciplinary teams can optimize treatment choice, biopsy timing, and quick enrollment of patients in clinical trials, before their performance status deteriorates.


Files in this item

Thumbnail
Name:
WJG-23-2448.pdf
Size:
2.016Mb
Format:
PDF
Description:
FInal Published Version

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record