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dc.contributor.authorNuño, Tomas
dc.contributor.authorBobrow, Bentley J.
dc.contributor.authorRogge-Miller, Karen A.
dc.contributor.authorPanczyk, Micah
dc.contributor.authorMullins, Terry
dc.contributor.authorTormala, Wayne
dc.contributor.authorEstrada, Antonio
dc.contributor.authorKeim, Samuel M.
dc.contributor.authorSpaite, Daniel W.
dc.date.accessioned2017-11-08T00:57:06Z
dc.date.available2017-11-08T00:57:06Z
dc.date.issued2017-06
dc.identifier.citationDisparities in telephone CPR access and timing during out-of-hospital cardiac arrest 2017, 115:11 Resuscitationen
dc.identifier.issn03009572
dc.identifier.pmid28342956
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.resuscitation.2017.03.028
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/626022
dc.description.abstractAim: Spanish-only speaking residents in the United States face barriers to receiving potentially life-saving 911 interventions such as Telephone-cardiopulmonary resuscitation (TCPR) instructions. Since 2015, 911 dispatchers have placed an increased emphasis on rapid identification of potential cardiac arrest. The purpose of this study was to describe the utilization and timing of the 911 system during suspected out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) by Spanish-speaking callers in Metropolitan Phoenix, Arizona. Methods: The dataset consisted of suspected OHCA from 911 centers from October 10, 2010 through December 31, 2013. Review of audio TCPR process data included whether the need for CPR was recognized by telecommunicators, whether CPR instructions were provided, and the time elements from call receipt to initiation of compressions. Results: A total of 3398 calls were made to 911 for suspected OHCA where CPR was indicated. A total of 39 (1.2%) were determined to have a Spanish language barrier. This averages to 18 calls per year with a Spanish language barrier during the study period, compared with 286 OHCAs expected per year among this population. The average time until telecommunicators recognized CPR need was 87.4 s for the no language barrier group compared to 160.6 s for the Spanish-language barrier group (p < 0.001). Time to CPR instructions started was significantly different between these groups (144.4 s vs 231.3 s, respectively) (p < 0.001), as was time to first compression, (174.4 s vs. 290.9 s, respectively) (p < 0.001). Conclusions: Our study suggests that Hispanic callers under-utilize the 911 system, and when they do call 911, there are significant delays in initiating CPR. (C) 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
dc.description.sponsorshipArizona Department of Health Services Bureau of Tobacco and Chronic Disease; Medtronic Philanthropy Foundation through the HeartRescue Program; NIH/NHLBI [5R25HL126140]en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherELSEVIER IRELAND LTDen
dc.relation.urlhttp://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0300957217301296en
dc.rights© 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.en
dc.subjectCardiac arresten
dc.subjectProcess outcomesen
dc.subjectDisparitiesen
dc.subjectTelephone cardiopulmonary resuscitationen
dc.titleDisparities in telephone CPR access and timing during out-of-hospital cardiac arresten
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniv Arizona, Coll Med, Arizona Emergency Med Res Ctren
dc.contributor.departmentUniv Arizona, Mel & Enid Zuckerman Coll Publ Hlth, Div Publ Hlth Practice & Translat Resen
dc.contributor.departmentUniv Arizona, Coll Social & Behav Sci, Dept Mexican Amer Studiesen
dc.identifier.journalResuscitationen
dc.description.note12 month embargo; Published online 23 March 2017.en
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item from the UA Faculty Publications collection is made available by the University of Arizona with support from the University of Arizona Libraries. If you have questions, please contact us at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.en
dc.eprint.versionFinal accepted manuscripten
refterms.dateFOA2018-03-24T00:00:00Z
html.description.abstractAim: Spanish-only speaking residents in the United States face barriers to receiving potentially life-saving 911 interventions such as Telephone-cardiopulmonary resuscitation (TCPR) instructions. Since 2015, 911 dispatchers have placed an increased emphasis on rapid identification of potential cardiac arrest. The purpose of this study was to describe the utilization and timing of the 911 system during suspected out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) by Spanish-speaking callers in Metropolitan Phoenix, Arizona. Methods: The dataset consisted of suspected OHCA from 911 centers from October 10, 2010 through December 31, 2013. Review of audio TCPR process data included whether the need for CPR was recognized by telecommunicators, whether CPR instructions were provided, and the time elements from call receipt to initiation of compressions. Results: A total of 3398 calls were made to 911 for suspected OHCA where CPR was indicated. A total of 39 (1.2%) were determined to have a Spanish language barrier. This averages to 18 calls per year with a Spanish language barrier during the study period, compared with 286 OHCAs expected per year among this population. The average time until telecommunicators recognized CPR need was 87.4 s for the no language barrier group compared to 160.6 s for the Spanish-language barrier group (p < 0.001). Time to CPR instructions started was significantly different between these groups (144.4 s vs 231.3 s, respectively) (p < 0.001), as was time to first compression, (174.4 s vs. 290.9 s, respectively) (p < 0.001). Conclusions: Our study suggests that Hispanic callers under-utilize the 911 system, and when they do call 911, there are significant delays in initiating CPR. (C) 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.


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