Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorHanselman, Paul
dc.contributor.authorFiel, Jeremy E.
dc.date.accessioned2017-11-08T23:09:21Z
dc.date.available2017-11-08T23:09:21Z
dc.date.issued2016-12-17
dc.identifier.citationSchool Opportunity Hoarding? Racial Segregation and Access to High Growth Schools 2016 Social Forcesen
dc.identifier.issn0037-7732
dc.identifier.issn1534-7605
dc.identifier.doi10.1093/sf/sow088
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/626027
dc.description.abstractPersistent school segregation may allow advantaged groups to hoard educational opportunities and consign minority students to lower-quality educational experiences. Although minority students are concentrated in low-achieving schools, relatively little previous research directly links segregation to measures of school quality based on student achievement growth, which more plausibly reflect learning opportunities. Using a dataset of public elementary schools in California, this study provides the first analysis detailing the distribution of a growth-based measure of school quality using standard inequality indices, allowing disparities to be decomposed across geographic and organizational scales. We find mixed support for the school opportunity hoarding hypothesis. We find small White and Asian advantages in access to high-growth schools, but most of the inequality in exposure to school growth is within racial groups. Growth-based disparities both between and within groups tend to be on a more local scale than disparities in absolute achievement levels, focusing attention on within-district policies to mitigate school-based inequalities in opportunities to learn.
dc.description.sponsorshipUS Department of Education [R305B120013]; Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development of the National Institutes of Health [P01HD065704]en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherOXFORD UNIV PRESS INCen
dc.relation.urlhttps://academic.oup.com/sf/article-lookup/doi/10.1093/sf/sow088en
dc.rights© The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.en
dc.titleSchool Opportunity Hoarding? Racial Segregation and Access to High Growth Schoolsen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Arizonaen
dc.identifier.journalSocial Forcesen
dc.description.note24 month embargo; Published: 03 February 2017en
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item from the UA Faculty Publications collection is made available by the University of Arizona with support from the University of Arizona Libraries. If you have questions, please contact us at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.en
dc.eprint.versionFinal accepted manuscripten
html.description.abstractPersistent school segregation may allow advantaged groups to hoard educational opportunities and consign minority students to lower-quality educational experiences. Although minority students are concentrated in low-achieving schools, relatively little previous research directly links segregation to measures of school quality based on student achievement growth, which more plausibly reflect learning opportunities. Using a dataset of public elementary schools in California, this study provides the first analysis detailing the distribution of a growth-based measure of school quality using standard inequality indices, allowing disparities to be decomposed across geographic and organizational scales. We find mixed support for the school opportunity hoarding hypothesis. We find small White and Asian advantages in access to high-growth schools, but most of the inequality in exposure to school growth is within racial groups. Growth-based disparities both between and within groups tend to be on a more local scale than disparities in absolute achievement levels, focusing attention on within-district policies to mitigate school-based inequalities in opportunities to learn.


Files in this item

Thumbnail
Name:
Fiel_Segregation_Growth.pdf
Size:
716.5Kb
Format:
PDF
Description:
Final Accepted Manuscript

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record