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dc.contributor.authorSimon, Jacob B.
dc.contributor.authorArmitage, Philip J.
dc.contributor.authorYoudin, Andrew N.
dc.contributor.authorLi, Rixin
dc.date.accessioned2017-11-14T23:49:43Z
dc.date.available2017-11-14T23:49:43Z
dc.date.issued2017-09-22
dc.identifier.citationEvidence for Universality in the Initial Planetesimal Mass Function 2017, 847 (2):L12 The Astrophysical Journalen
dc.identifier.issn2041-8213
dc.identifier.doi10.3847/2041-8213/aa8c79
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/626045
dc.description.abstractPlanetesimals may form from the gravitational collapse of dense particle clumps initiated by the streaming instability. We use simulations of aerodynamically coupled gas-particle mixtures to investigate whether the properties of planetesimals formed in this way depend upon the sizes of the particles that participate in the instability. Based on three high-resolution simulations that span a range of dimensionless stopping times 6 X 10(-3) <= tau <= 2, no statistically significant differences in the initial planetesimal mass function are found. The mass functions are fit by a power law, dN/dM(p) proportional to M-p(-p), with p = 1.5-1.7 and errors of Delta p approximate to 0.1. Comparing the particle density fields prior to collapse, we find that the high-wavenumber power spectra are similarly indistinguishable, though the large-scale geometry of structures induced via the streaming instability is significantly different between all three cases. We interpret the results as evidence for a near-universal slope to the mass function, arising from the small-scale structure of streaming-induced turbulence.
dc.description.sponsorshipNASA [NNX13AI58G, NNX16AB42G]; NSF [AST 1313021, AST 1616929]; Texas Advanced Computing Center through XSEDE grant [TG-AST120062]; National Science Foundation [NSF PHY-1125915]en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherIOP PUBLISHING LTDen
dc.relation.urlhttp://stacks.iop.org/2041-8205/847/i=2/a=L12?key=crossref.254170f283d7e9e80660238a10223672en
dc.rights© 2017. The American Astronomical Society. All rights reserved.en
dc.rights.urihttp://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/
dc.subjecthydrodynamicsen
dc.subjectinstabilitiesen
dc.subjectplanets and satellites: formationen
dc.titleEvidence for Universality in the Initial Planetesimal Mass Functionen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniv Arizona, Dept Astronen
dc.contributor.departmentUniv Arizona, Steward Observen
dc.identifier.journalThe Astrophysical Journal Lettersen
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item from the UA Faculty Publications collection is made available by the University of Arizona with support from the University of Arizona Libraries. If you have questions, please contact us at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.en
dc.eprint.versionFinal published versionen
refterms.dateFOA2018-06-11T23:06:50Z
html.description.abstractPlanetesimals may form from the gravitational collapse of dense particle clumps initiated by the streaming instability. We use simulations of aerodynamically coupled gas-particle mixtures to investigate whether the properties of planetesimals formed in this way depend upon the sizes of the particles that participate in the instability. Based on three high-resolution simulations that span a range of dimensionless stopping times 6 X 10(-3) <= tau <= 2, no statistically significant differences in the initial planetesimal mass function are found. The mass functions are fit by a power law, dN/dM(p) proportional to M-p(-p), with p = 1.5-1.7 and errors of Delta p approximate to 0.1. Comparing the particle density fields prior to collapse, we find that the high-wavenumber power spectra are similarly indistinguishable, though the large-scale geometry of structures induced via the streaming instability is significantly different between all three cases. We interpret the results as evidence for a near-universal slope to the mass function, arising from the small-scale structure of streaming-induced turbulence.


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