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dc.contributor.authorYoussef, Asser M.*
dc.contributor.authorHamidian Jahromi, Alireza*
dc.contributor.authorSimpkins, Cuthbert O.*
dc.date.accessioned2017-11-17T21:21:49Z
dc.date.available2017-11-17T21:21:49Z
dc.date.issued2016-08-06
dc.identifier.citationArterial versus Venous Fluid Resuscitation; Restoring Cardiac Contractions in Cardiac Arrest Following Exsanguinations 2016, 22 (2) Trauma Monthlyen
dc.identifier.issn2251-7464
dc.identifier.issn2251-7472
dc.identifier.doi10.5812/traumamon.29935
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/626110
dc.description.abstractBackground: Arterial cannulation and intra-arterial (IA) fluid and blood resuscitation in the patients with severe shock is an easier approach compared with the intravenous (IV) access if concerns regarding the efficiency and safety of this approach are addressed. Objectives: We hypothesized that IA fluid resuscitation is more effective than IV resuscitation in restoring cardiac contractions (CC) of cardiac-arrested mice following severe hemorrhagic shock. Methods: Mice (N = 22) were anesthetized using ketamine/xylazine. Arterial and venous systems accessed through cannulation of the carotid artery and the Jugular vein, respectively. As much blood as possible was aspirated from the carotid artery access. Mice were observed until the complete cessation of chest wall motions. Following 30 seconds delay, IV (N = 5) and IA access (N = 6) were used for fluid resuscitation using Ringer Lactate (RL) in a similar volume to the aspirated blood. Mice were observed for restoration of chest wall motions. In phase-II of the study, after cessation of chest motions, mice (N = 11) underwent a thoracotomy and CCs were observed. In three mice, IV RL Infusion after cardiac arrest failed to restore CCs and was followed by IA RL infusion. In eight mice, following cardiac arrest intermittent IA RL infusion was performed. Results: While IV RL Infusion failed to restore chest motion in mice (N = 5), IA RL infusion restored chest motion in all mice examined (N = 6) (P = 0.0067). In three mice, IV RL infusion after cardiac arrest showed no effect on CC. After failure of venous infusion, IA RL infusion was performed which resulted in restoration of CC for 13.33 +/- 1.76 minutes. In eight mice, intermittent IA infusion of RL after cardiac arrest, sustained CC for 31.43 +/- 10.9 minutes (P = 0.017). Conclusions: IA fluid resuscitation is superior to IV resuscitation in hemorrhagic shock induced cardiac arrest.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherBAQIYATALLAH UNIV MEDICAL SCIENCESen
dc.relation.urlhttp://traumamon.com/en/articles/13451.htmlen
dc.rightsCopyright © 2016, Trauma Monthly. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License.en
dc.subjectArterialen
dc.subjectVenousen
dc.subjectFluid Resuscitationen
dc.subjectCardiac Contractionsen
dc.subjectCardiac Arresten
dc.subjectExsanguinationsen
dc.titleArterial versus Venous Fluid Resuscitation; Restoring Cardiac Contractions in Cardiac Arrest Following Exsanguinationsen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniv Arizona, Chandler Reg Med Ctr, Coll Med Phoenixen
dc.identifier.journalTrauma Monthlyen
dc.description.noteOpen access article.en
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item from the UA Faculty Publications collection is made available by the University of Arizona with support from the University of Arizona Libraries. If you have questions, please contact us at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.en
dc.eprint.versionFinal published versionen
refterms.dateFOA2018-09-12T00:11:01Z
html.description.abstractBackground: Arterial cannulation and intra-arterial (IA) fluid and blood resuscitation in the patients with severe shock is an easier approach compared with the intravenous (IV) access if concerns regarding the efficiency and safety of this approach are addressed. Objectives: We hypothesized that IA fluid resuscitation is more effective than IV resuscitation in restoring cardiac contractions (CC) of cardiac-arrested mice following severe hemorrhagic shock. Methods: Mice (N = 22) were anesthetized using ketamine/xylazine. Arterial and venous systems accessed through cannulation of the carotid artery and the Jugular vein, respectively. As much blood as possible was aspirated from the carotid artery access. Mice were observed until the complete cessation of chest wall motions. Following 30 seconds delay, IV (N = 5) and IA access (N = 6) were used for fluid resuscitation using Ringer Lactate (RL) in a similar volume to the aspirated blood. Mice were observed for restoration of chest wall motions. In phase-II of the study, after cessation of chest motions, mice (N = 11) underwent a thoracotomy and CCs were observed. In three mice, IV RL Infusion after cardiac arrest failed to restore CCs and was followed by IA RL infusion. In eight mice, following cardiac arrest intermittent IA RL infusion was performed. Results: While IV RL Infusion failed to restore chest motion in mice (N = 5), IA RL infusion restored chest motion in all mice examined (N = 6) (P = 0.0067). In three mice, IV RL infusion after cardiac arrest showed no effect on CC. After failure of venous infusion, IA RL infusion was performed which resulted in restoration of CC for 13.33 +/- 1.76 minutes. In eight mice, intermittent IA infusion of RL after cardiac arrest, sustained CC for 31.43 +/- 10.9 minutes (P = 0.017). Conclusions: IA fluid resuscitation is superior to IV resuscitation in hemorrhagic shock induced cardiac arrest.


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