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dc.contributor.authorMercieca-Bebber, Rebecca L*
dc.contributor.authorPrice, Melanie A*
dc.contributor.authorBell, Melanie L*
dc.contributor.authorKing, Madeleine T*
dc.contributor.authorWebb, Penelope M*
dc.contributor.authorButow, Phyllis N*
dc.date.accessioned2017-11-22T20:41:21Z
dc.date.available2017-11-22T20:41:21Z
dc.date.issued2017-10
dc.identifier.citationOvarian cancer study dropouts had worse health-related quality of life and psychosocial symptoms at baseline and over time 2017, 13 (5):e381 Asia-Pacific Journal of Clinical Oncologyen
dc.identifier.issn17437555
dc.identifier.pmid27573704
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/ajco.12580
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/626118
dc.description.abstractAimsParticipant drop out is a major barrier to high-quality patient-reported outcome (PRO) data analysis in cancer research as patients with worsening health are more likely to dropout. To test the hypothesis that ovarian cancer patients with worse PROs would drop out earlier, we examined how patients differed by time of dropout on health-related quality of life (HRQOL), anxiety, depression, optimism and insomnia. MethodsThis analysis included 619 participants, stratified by time of dropout, from the Australian Ovarian Cancer Study - Quality of Life substudy, in which participants completed PRO questionnaires at three-monthly intervals for 21 months. Trends in PROs over time were examined. Pearson correlations examined the relationship between time of dropout and baseline PROs. Multiple linear regression models including age, disease stage and time since diagnosis examined relationships between baseline and final PRO scores, and final PRO scores and dropout group. ResultsParticipants who dropped out earlier had significantly worse baseline HRQOL (p<0.0001) and higher depression (p<0.0001). For all five PROs, final scores were significantly associated with baseline scores (p<0.0001). Time of dropout was significantly associated with final HRQOL (p=0.003), anxiety (p=0.05), depression (p=0.02) and optimism (p=0.02) scores. Depression, HRQOL and anxiety worsened at a faster rate overtime in dropouts than study completers. ConclusionsPoorer HRQOL and higher depression at baseline, and final HRQOL, anxiety, depression and optimism scores were predictive of time of dropout. These results highlight the importance of collecting auxiliary data to inform careful and considered handling of missing PRO data during analysis, interpretation and reporting.
dc.description.sponsorshipCancer Council of New South Wales [RG 36/05]; Cancer Council of Queensland [RG 36/05]; U.S. Army Medical Research and Materiel Command [DAMD17-01-1-0729]; National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC) [400413, 400281, 199600]; Cancer Council of New South Wales; Cancer Council of Queensland; Cancer Council of South Australia; Cancer Council of Tasmania; Cancer Council of Victoria; Cancer Council of Western Australia; Sydney Catalyst; Cancer Institute New South Wales; Australian Government, courtesy of Cancer Australia; Australian Government through NHMRCen
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherWILEYen
dc.relation.urlhttp://doi.wiley.com/10.1111/ajco.12580en
dc.rights© 2016 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltden
dc.subjectdepressionen
dc.subjectovarian neoplasmsen
dc.subjectpatient outcome assessmenten
dc.subjectquality of lifeen
dc.titleOvarian cancer study dropouts had worse health-related quality of life and psychosocial symptoms at baseline and over timeen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniv Arizona, Mel & Enid Zuckerman Coll Publ Hlthen
dc.identifier.journalAsia-Pacific Journal of Clinical Oncologyen
dc.description.note12 month embargo; published online: 30 August 2016en
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item from the UA Faculty Publications collection is made available by the University of Arizona with support from the University of Arizona Libraries. If you have questions, please contact us at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.en
dc.eprint.versionFinal accepted manuscripten
dc.contributor.institutionCentral Clinical School; Sydney Medical School; University of Sydney; NSW Australia
dc.contributor.institutionPsycho-oncology Co-operative Research Group (PoCoG); School of Psychology, University of Sydney; NSW Australia
dc.contributor.institutionPsycho-oncology Co-operative Research Group (PoCoG); School of Psychology, University of Sydney; NSW Australia
dc.contributor.institutionCentral Clinical School; Sydney Medical School; University of Sydney; NSW Australia
dc.contributor.institutionQIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute; Brisbane Australia
dc.contributor.institutionPsycho-oncology Co-operative Research Group (PoCoG); School of Psychology, University of Sydney; NSW Australia
refterms.dateFOA2017-08-30T00:00:00Z
html.description.abstractAimsParticipant drop out is a major barrier to high-quality patient-reported outcome (PRO) data analysis in cancer research as patients with worsening health are more likely to dropout. To test the hypothesis that ovarian cancer patients with worse PROs would drop out earlier, we examined how patients differed by time of dropout on health-related quality of life (HRQOL), anxiety, depression, optimism and insomnia. MethodsThis analysis included 619 participants, stratified by time of dropout, from the Australian Ovarian Cancer Study - Quality of Life substudy, in which participants completed PRO questionnaires at three-monthly intervals for 21 months. Trends in PROs over time were examined. Pearson correlations examined the relationship between time of dropout and baseline PROs. Multiple linear regression models including age, disease stage and time since diagnosis examined relationships between baseline and final PRO scores, and final PRO scores and dropout group. ResultsParticipants who dropped out earlier had significantly worse baseline HRQOL (p<0.0001) and higher depression (p<0.0001). For all five PROs, final scores were significantly associated with baseline scores (p<0.0001). Time of dropout was significantly associated with final HRQOL (p=0.003), anxiety (p=0.05), depression (p=0.02) and optimism (p=0.02) scores. Depression, HRQOL and anxiety worsened at a faster rate overtime in dropouts than study completers. ConclusionsPoorer HRQOL and higher depression at baseline, and final HRQOL, anxiety, depression and optimism scores were predictive of time of dropout. These results highlight the importance of collecting auxiliary data to inform careful and considered handling of missing PRO data during analysis, interpretation and reporting.


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