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dc.contributor.advisorBurross, Heidi Leggen
dc.contributor.authorBaig, Ambareen
dc.creatorBaig, Ambareenen
dc.date.accessioned2017-11-29T01:12:28Z
dc.date.available2017-11-29T01:12:28Z
dc.date.issued2017
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/626140
dc.description.abstractThe ability to transfer knowledge to novel contexts is one of the most important goals that our educational institutions must achieve. Motivation is one of the many factors that influence students' learning, performance, and their ability to transfer. However, not many researchers have studied the role of motivation in transfer keeping in view Eccles' Subjective task value theory. The present study explored the role of subjective values students associate with cognitive development theories they studied in an educational psychology course, in their ability to transfer knowledge learned in lecture to a novel context. Participants were 45 college students in an educational psychology course. They were asked to complete the subjective task value instrument, the fundamental knowledge test and the transfer test. Based on the literature, it is hypothesized that if the subjective value of a task has a role to play in the level of transfer that learners display, there will be a strong correlation between their scores on the subjective task value instrument and transfer test. Nevertheless, the results showed that there is no relationship between learners' value beliefs and their ability to transfer. However, the results showed a significant relationship between fundamental understanding and transfer. Future research taking the nature of instruction into account and that test the learners for transfer multiple times during a single semester would perhaps give us a much clearer picture of the determinants of the learners' failure to transfer.
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en
dc.subjectattainment valueen
dc.subjectcosten
dc.subjectexpectancy value theoryen
dc.subjectintrinsic valueen
dc.subjectsubjective task valuesen
dc.subjecttransferen
dc.titleRelationship Between the Subjective Task Value of a Course and Level of Transfer Displayed by Learners of Cognitive Behavioral Theoriesen_US
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen
thesis.degree.levelmastersen
dc.contributor.committeememberBurross, Heidi Leggen
dc.contributor.committeememberMcCaslin, Maryen
dc.contributor.committeememberTullis, Jonathanen
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen
thesis.degree.disciplineEducational Psychologyen
thesis.degree.nameM.A.en
refterms.dateFOA2018-09-12T00:14:02Z
html.description.abstractThe ability to transfer knowledge to novel contexts is one of the most important goals that our educational institutions must achieve. Motivation is one of the many factors that influence students' learning, performance, and their ability to transfer. However, not many researchers have studied the role of motivation in transfer keeping in view Eccles' Subjective task value theory. The present study explored the role of subjective values students associate with cognitive development theories they studied in an educational psychology course, in their ability to transfer knowledge learned in lecture to a novel context. Participants were 45 college students in an educational psychology course. They were asked to complete the subjective task value instrument, the fundamental knowledge test and the transfer test. Based on the literature, it is hypothesized that if the subjective value of a task has a role to play in the level of transfer that learners display, there will be a strong correlation between their scores on the subjective task value instrument and transfer test. Nevertheless, the results showed that there is no relationship between learners' value beliefs and their ability to transfer. However, the results showed a significant relationship between fundamental understanding and transfer. Future research taking the nature of instruction into account and that test the learners for transfer multiple times during a single semester would perhaps give us a much clearer picture of the determinants of the learners' failure to transfer.


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