Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorHashim, Matthew J.
dc.contributor.authorKannan, Karthik N.
dc.contributor.authorMaximiano, Sandra
dc.contributor.authorUlmer, Jackie Rees
dc.date.accessioned2017-11-29T01:48:02Z
dc.date.available2017-11-29T01:48:02Z
dc.date.issued2014-10-01
dc.identifier.citationDigital Piracy, Teens, and the Source of Advice: An Experimental Study 2014, 31 (2):211 Journal of Management Information Systemsen
dc.identifier.issn0742-1222
dc.identifier.issn1557-928X
dc.identifier.doi10.2753/MIS0742-1222310208
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/626172
dc.description.abstractThe objective of our paper is to determine the effect of piracy advice from various sources on music consumer behavior. Specifically, does it matter if the source of advice has a stake in the outcome of the piracy decision? Does it matter if the source of advice has a social tie with the advisee? Accordingly, we conduct a lab experiment using teenagers and their parents as subjects, increasing the realism of the context by sampling potential pirates and their parents. Treatments represent various sources of piracy advice (e.g., the teen’s parent, a record label, or an external regulator). Subjects make decisions playing our new experimental game – The Piracy Game – extended from the volunteer’s dilemma literature. Interestingly, subjects respond negatively to advice from record labels over time, purchasing fewer songs as compared to other sources such as the subject’s parent. The existence of a social tie between the advisor and the subject assists in mitigating piracy, especially when a parent is facing potential penalties due to his/her child’s behavior. An external regulator, having no social tie or stake in the decision, provides the least credible source of advice, leading to the greatest amount of piracy. Our analyses not only provide managerial insights but also develop theoretical understanding of the role of social ties in the context of advice.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.2753/MIS0742-1222310208en
dc.rights© 2014 M.E. Sharpe, Inc. All rights reserved.en
dc.rights.urihttp://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/
dc.subjectpiracyen
dc.subjectadviceen
dc.subjectcommunicationen
dc.subjectexperimental economicsen
dc.subjectvolunteer's dilemmaen
dc.titleDigital Piracy, Teens, and the Source of Advice: An Experimental Studyen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Arizonaen
dc.contributor.departmentPurdue Universityen
dc.identifier.journalJournal of Management Information Systemsen
dc.description.note18 month embargo; published online: 07 Dec 2014en
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item from the UA Faculty Publications collection is made available by the University of Arizona with support from the University of Arizona Libraries. If you have questions, please contact us at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.en
dc.eprint.versionFinal accepted manuscripten
refterms.dateFOA2018-04-26T03:44:18Z
html.description.abstractThe objective of our paper is to determine the effect of piracy advice from various sources on music consumer behavior. Specifically, does it matter if the source of advice has a stake in the outcome of the piracy decision? Does it matter if the source of advice has a social tie with the advisee? Accordingly, we conduct a lab experiment using teenagers and their parents as subjects, increasing the realism of the context by sampling potential pirates and their parents. Treatments represent various sources of piracy advice (e.g., the teen’s parent, a record label, or an external regulator). Subjects make decisions playing our new experimental game – The Piracy Game – extended from the volunteer’s dilemma literature. Interestingly, subjects respond negatively to advice from record labels over time, purchasing fewer songs as compared to other sources such as the subject’s parent. The existence of a social tie between the advisor and the subject assists in mitigating piracy, especially when a parent is facing potential penalties due to his/her child’s behavior. An external regulator, having no social tie or stake in the decision, provides the least credible source of advice, leading to the greatest amount of piracy. Our analyses not only provide managerial insights but also develop theoretical understanding of the role of social ties in the context of advice.


Files in this item

Thumbnail
Name:
Hashim Source of Advice JMIS ...
Size:
375.1Kb
Format:
PDF
Description:
Final Accepted Manuscript

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record