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dc.contributor.advisorChristopherson, Garyen
dc.contributor.authorHerndon, Carly
dc.date.accessioned2017-12-19T01:33:19Z
dc.date.available2017-12-19T01:33:19Z
dc.date.issued2017-12
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/626246
dc.description.abstractAgricultural crop diversity in the Southwest has diminished significantly over the past hundred years. A local nonprofit in Tucson by the name of Native Seeds/SEARCH (NS/S) aims to conserve Southwestern crop diversity for the sake of keeping indigenous culture alive, improving food security, and to nourish a changing world. One way NS/S works towards these goals is to freely distribute seeds through their Community Seed Grant (CSG) program. The CSG program supports educational, food security, and community development projects in the Greater Southwest region. These seed donations are meant to serve underprivileged groups, including but not limited to Native American and Hispanic individuals as well as areas with high poverty rates. These populations are among some of the most food insecure in the region. This study analyzes the successfulness of the CSG program by measuring if intended audiences are being awarded CSGs. Summary statistics suggests that CSGs are in areas with higher than average Hispanic and Native American individuals as well as individuals living below the poverty line. A logistic regression was also done to spot correlations between target areas and where the seeds were sent. This analysis suggests that seed grants favor areas with higher percentages of Hispanic and Black or African American individuals as well as areas with higher poverty rates. This study will help NS/S perform more targeted marketing and assistance about the program as well as show potential and current funders the outcomes of the CSG program.
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en
dc.titleA Spatial Analysis of Community Development in Arizona from Seed Grantsen_US
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Reporten
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen
thesis.degree.levelmastersen
thesis.degree.disciplineGeographic Information Systems Technologyen
thesis.degree.nameM.S.en
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item is part of the MS-GIST Master's Reports collection. For more information about items in this collection, please contact the UA Campus Repository at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.en
refterms.dateFOA2018-05-27T14:38:36Z
html.description.abstractAgricultural crop diversity in the Southwest has diminished significantly over the past hundred years. A local nonprofit in Tucson by the name of Native Seeds/SEARCH (NS/S) aims to conserve Southwestern crop diversity for the sake of keeping indigenous culture alive, improving food security, and to nourish a changing world. One way NS/S works towards these goals is to freely distribute seeds through their Community Seed Grant (CSG) program. The CSG program supports educational, food security, and community development projects in the Greater Southwest region. These seed donations are meant to serve underprivileged groups, including but not limited to Native American and Hispanic individuals as well as areas with high poverty rates. These populations are among some of the most food insecure in the region. This study analyzes the successfulness of the CSG program by measuring if intended audiences are being awarded CSGs. Summary statistics suggests that CSGs are in areas with higher than average Hispanic and Native American individuals as well as individuals living below the poverty line. A logistic regression was also done to spot correlations between target areas and where the seeds were sent. This analysis suggests that seed grants favor areas with higher percentages of Hispanic and Black or African American individuals as well as areas with higher poverty rates. This study will help NS/S perform more targeted marketing and assistance about the program as well as show potential and current funders the outcomes of the CSG program.


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