Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorWhitney, Paul*
dc.contributor.authorHinson, John M.*
dc.contributor.authorSatterfield, Brieann C.*
dc.contributor.authorGrant, Devon A.*
dc.contributor.authorHonn, Kimberly A.*
dc.contributor.authorVan Dongen, Hans P. A.*
dc.date.accessioned2017-12-21T17:39:07Z
dc.date.available2017-12-21T17:39:07Z
dc.date.issued2017-11-22
dc.identifier.citationSleep Deprivation Diminishes Attentional Control Effectiveness and Impairs Flexible Adaptation to Changing Conditions 2017, 7 (1) Scientific Reportsen
dc.identifier.issn2045-2322
dc.identifier.doi10.1038/s41598-017-16165-z
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/626286
dc.description.abstractInsufficient sleep is a global public health problem resulting in catastrophic accidents, increased mortality, and hundreds of billions of dollars in lost productivity. Yet the effect of sleep deprivation (SD) on decision making and performance is often underestimated by fatigued individuals and is only beginning to be understood by scientists. The deleterious impact of SD is frequently attributed to lapses in vigilant attention, but this account fails to explain many SD-related problems, such as loss of situational awareness and perseveration. Using a laboratory study protocol, we show that SD individuals can maintain information in the focus of attention and anticipate likely correct responses, but their use of such a top-down attentional strategy is less effective at preventing errors caused by competing responses. Moreover, when the task environment requires flexibility, performance under SD suffers dramatically. The impairment in flexible shifting of attentional control we observed is distinct from lapses in vigilant attention, as corroborated by the specificity of the influence of a genetic biomarker, the dopaminergic polymorphism DRD2 C957T. Reduced effectiveness of top-down attentional control under SD, especially when conditions require flexibility, helps to explain maladaptive performance that is not readily explained by lapses in vigilant attention.
dc.description.sponsorshipOffice of Naval Research grant [N00014-13-1-0302]en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherNATURE PUBLISHING GROUPen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.nature.com/articles/s41598-017-16165-zen
dc.rights© The Author(s) 2017. This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.en
dc.titleSleep Deprivation Diminishes Attentional Control Effectiveness and Impairs Flexible Adaptation to Changing Conditionsen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniv Arizona, Dept Psychol, Coll Meden
dc.identifier.journalScientific Reportsen
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item from the UA Faculty Publications collection is made available by the University of Arizona with support from the University of Arizona Libraries. If you have questions, please contact us at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.en
dc.eprint.versionFinal published versionen
refterms.dateFOA2018-08-13T18:42:27Z
html.description.abstractInsufficient sleep is a global public health problem resulting in catastrophic accidents, increased mortality, and hundreds of billions of dollars in lost productivity. Yet the effect of sleep deprivation (SD) on decision making and performance is often underestimated by fatigued individuals and is only beginning to be understood by scientists. The deleterious impact of SD is frequently attributed to lapses in vigilant attention, but this account fails to explain many SD-related problems, such as loss of situational awareness and perseveration. Using a laboratory study protocol, we show that SD individuals can maintain information in the focus of attention and anticipate likely correct responses, but their use of such a top-down attentional strategy is less effective at preventing errors caused by competing responses. Moreover, when the task environment requires flexibility, performance under SD suffers dramatically. The impairment in flexible shifting of attentional control we observed is distinct from lapses in vigilant attention, as corroborated by the specificity of the influence of a genetic biomarker, the dopaminergic polymorphism DRD2 C957T. Reduced effectiveness of top-down attentional control under SD, especially when conditions require flexibility, helps to explain maladaptive performance that is not readily explained by lapses in vigilant attention.


Files in this item

Thumbnail
Name:
s41598-017-16165-z.pdf
Size:
1.224Mb
Format:
PDF
Description:
Final Published Version

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record