• TELEMETRY AND DATA LOGGING IN A FORMULA SAE RACE CAR

      Marcellin, Michael; Schultz, Aaron; Univ Arizona (International Foundation for Telemetering, 2017-10)
      The problem with designing and simulating a race car entirely through CAD and other computer simulations, is that the real world behavior of the car will differ from the results outputted from CFD and FEA analysis. One way to learn more about how the car actually handles, is through telemetry and data logging of many different sensors on the car while it is running at racing speeds. This data can help the engineering team build new components, and tune the many different systems on the car in order to get the fastest time around a track as possible.
    • Permanent Magnet Synchronous Motor Variable Frequency Drive System

      Kosbar, Kurt; Schad, Judah; Nichols, Cameron; Brinker, Katelyn; Missouri University of Science and Technology (International Foundation for Telemetering, 2017-10)
      This paper discusses a permanent magnet synchronous motor (PMSM) variable frequency drive (VFD) system developed for an all-terrain Wifi-HaLow connected (802.11ah, 900 MHz) modular electric vehicle that competed in the Mars University Rover Challenge (URC). The quadrature axis flux linkage for each motor was estimated using on-board voltage and current measurements. A synchronous control algorithm tracked the electromagnetic operating parameters, which are highly dependent on variations in motor construction and load conditions. A feed-forward model-driven observer solution calculated flux linkage angles by direct-quadrature-zero transformation of three-phase shunt currents using DSP processors.
    • A DISTRIBUTED SENSOR NETWORK FOR AN OFF-ROAD RACING VEHICLE

      Marcellin, Michael; Boyer, Kyle; Brubaker, Laura; Everly, Kyle; Herriman, RIchard; Houston, Paul; Ruckle, Sean; Scobie, Rory; Ulanday, Ian; Univ Arizona (International Foundation for Telemetering, 2017-10)
      The University of Arizona Baja Racing Team competes annually in an intense off-road racing competition. This year’s car features a distributed sensor network capable of displaying useful data to the driver, the benefits and technical aspects of which are examined by this paper. Based on the ATmega2560 chip, the system is USB programmable, features hot-swappable batteries, and includes SMD components. Each sensor is custom designed, functions as an I2C slave, and contains its own ATtiny85 microcontroller allowing all the sensors to be addressable and enables them to be wired in parallel. The system also includes interrupts for almost every single sensor, which allows for more accurate data collection and guarantees that no important data will be missed. A custom-made board was created to connect these sensors and serve as a microcontroller data logger based on an Arduino reference design.
    • Mobile Diagnostics for Personal Electrics Transportation Devices

      Prescott, Glenn; Gilchrist, Zachary A.; Univ Kansas, Electrical Engineering Design Laboratory (International Foundation for Telemetering, 2017-10)
      The ultimate purpose of this project was to improve on a new electric form of transportation. These methods of transportation have been gaining popularity for those who have relatively short commutes, and this project poises that group as the target audience. As a result of these trends and the practicality of small personal transportation, the design team made the purpose to attain usable real-world practicality and walking replacement ability. Other types of devices have been created before, however they usually have a short ride time and do not go much faster than the average walking speed. That being said, this design also uses telemetry to serve as a proof of concept that internal data can be sent to a receiver from a distant location. The end result was expected to be an enjoyable experience that gave a mobile diagnostics system.
    • AUTONOMOUS GROUND RECONNAISSANCE DRONE USING ROBOT OPERATING SYSTEM (ROS)

      Marcellin, Michael W.; Hung, David; Tang, Cinthya; Allred, Coby; McKeever, Kennon; Murphy, James; Herriman, Ricky; Univ Arizona, Dept Elect & Comp Engn (International Foundation for Telemetering, 2017-10)
      The Arizona Autonomous Club is a student organization at the University of Arizona which designs, builds, and competes with Unmanned Air Systems (UAS). This year, a 25% scale Xtreme Decathlon model aircraft was selected and successfully converted into a fully autonomous UAS for the AUVSI Student Unmanned Aerial Systems (SUAS) 2017 competition. The UAS utilizes a Pixhawk autopilot unit, which is an independent, open-hardware project aiming at providing high-end autopilot hardware at low costs and high availability. The Pixhawk runs an efficient real time operating system (RTOS) and includes sensors such as a GPS unit, IMUs, airspeed, etc. The UAS also includes an onboard imaging system, which is controlled by an onboard computer (OBC). The Pixhawk and OBC are interconnected with two ground control stations (GCS) using the Robot Operating System (ROS) framework, which is capable of extending overall system capabilities to include an expanded telemetry downlink, obstacle avoidance, and manual overrides.
    • A TRADE STUDY TO DETERMINE THE BEST LOCATION FOR TM RECEIVERS

      Diehl, Michael; Fraser, Ryan; Green, Jonathan; Swain, Jason; Air Combat Systems Directorate, U.S. Army Yuma Proving Ground (International Foundation for Telemetering, 2017-10)
      As part of a larger effort to improve telemetry link availability, the U.S. Army Yuma Proving Ground (YPG) is currently in the process of upgrading its telemetry receivers. As YPG begins integrating new receivers into existing range infrastructure, the question of where to place these receivers to provide maximum benefit must be considered. Should the receivers be placed at each of the remote antennas or should they be centrally located at the primary telemetry site? Although many Telemetry-over-Internet Protocol (TMoIP) and radio frequency (RF) over fiber solutions exist to transport these data, there are numerous concerns including network and Cybersecurity limitations to consider when implementing either of these approaches. This paper will document the trade study conducted at YPG to explore the benefits of each approach.
    • MULTIHOP ROUTING OF TELEMETRY DATA IN DRONE SWARMS

      Rohrer, Justin P.; Pospischil, Alexis; Department of Computer Science, Naval Postgraduate School (International Foundation for Telemetering, 2017-10)
      In 2015, a group of Naval Postgraduate School (NPS) professors and students set the record for largest fixed-wing unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) swarm flown at one time. The swarm had 50 vehicles flying simultaneously and successfully demonstrated distributed decision-making with all processing occurring on swarm vehicles rather than a centralized control station. Much of the decision-making is based on telemetry data that is continuously streamed from all the nodes. At that time all telemetry data was broadcast in a single-hop radio environment using 802.11 in AdHoc mode. In the future, drone swarm distribution and mobility patterns will necessitate multi-hop communications for this telemetry data. This paper models the network currently used by the NPS drone swarm as well as potential future topologies and evaluates candidate multihop routing protocols for this application.
    • OVERVIEW OF SECURE COGNITIVE RADIO MAC PROTOCOL IN THE PROPOSED 3.5 GHZ BAND

      Dean, Richard; Moazzami, Farzad; Oyediran, David; Morgan State University, Electrical and Computer Engineering Department (International Foundation for Telemetering, 2017-10)
      Spectrum sharing between federal and commercial users is proposed by the FCC and NTIA to open up the 3.5 GHz band for wireless broadband use. The proposed technology requires the detection and subsequent allocation of available licensed spectrum for temporary use by other users without compromising the privacy of the licensed user. DoD has a documented requirement of 865 MHz by 2025 to support telemetry but only 445 MHz is presently available. Research is presently on-going at DoD to realize, test and evaluate spectrum efficient technology with the aim to develop, demonstrate, and evaluate technology components required to enable flight and ground test telemetry operations. The use of cognitive radio (CR) in spectrum sharing has gained much popularity in that CR senses the unused spectrum at a specific time and location and dynamically allocates to users as required. This paper will provide an overview of a secured CR Media Access Protocols using the IEEE 802.22. Carrier Sense Multiple Access Collision Avoidance (CSMA/CA) will be utilized for protocol transmission in order to properly identify user’s location and identity thereby providing a secured network against false alarm from external attack.
    • AN INTERNET-BASED REMOTE COMMAND AND TELEMETRY SYSTEM FOR A MICROWAVE PROPAGATION STUDY

      Colapelle, Mario; Zamore, Brian; Kopp, Brian; Pierce, Randy; Univ N Florida, Elec Eng Dept; Florida Department of Transportation, Intelligent Transportation Systems Office (International Foundation for Telemetering, 2017-10)
      A research project investigating microwave radio frequency propagation in a 500 mile link across the Gulf of Mexico requires a remote-control process to command microcontroller-based devices including power control modules and antenna feedhorn positioners, and to telemeter system parameters back to the operators. The solution that was developed is a simple, webserver-based user-interface that can be accessed both locally and remotely via the internet. To interface the webservers with the microcontroller-based devices, a polling protocol, based on MODBUS, was developed that provides an efficient command and telemetry link over a serial RS-485 interface.
    • PERFORMANCE OF IEEE 802.11S FOR WIRELESS MESH TELEMETRY NETWORKS

      Kosbar, Kurt; Zawodniok, Maciej; Price, Nathan D.; Chandran, Arul Mathi Maran; Missouri University of Science and Technology (International Foundation for Telemetering, 2017-10)
      Wide area sensor networks have numerous agricultural, industrial, scientific, medical, and military applications. For many years now, such networks have been implemented through wireless mesh networks. As wireless mesh networks have come to maturity, several network standards have become readily available. The WiFi mesh extension 802.11s was finalized in 2008 and officially adopted into the 802.11 standard in 2012, is extremely interesting thanks to the wide spread adoption of WiFi and low cost. In this paper, we evaluate the performance of a small 802.11s net-work implemented on low-cost, off-the-shelf single board computers for the purpose of building a telemetry sensor network.
    • PERFORMANCE EVALUATION FOR DECISION-FEEDBACK EQUALIZER WITH PARAMETER SELECTION ON UNDERWATER ACOUSTIC COMMUNICATION

      Nassr, Husam; Kosbar, Kurt; Missouri University of Science and Technology (International Foundation for Telemetering, 2017-10)
      This paper investigates the effect of parameter selection for the decision feedback equalization (DFE) on communication performance through a dispersive underwater acoustic wireless channel (UAWC). A DFE based on minimum mean-square error (MMSE-DFE) criterion has been employed in the implementation for evaluation purposes. The output from the MMSE-DFE is input to the decoder to estimate the transmitted bit sequence. The main goal of this experimental simulation is to determine the best selection, such that the reduction in the computational overload is achieved without altering the performance of the system, where the computational complexity can be reduced by selecting an equalizer with a proper length. The system performance is tested for BPSK, QPSK, 8PSK and 16QAM modulation and a simulation for the system is carried out for Proakis channel A and real underwater wireless acoustic channel estimated during SPACE08 measurements to verify the selection.
    • ELASTIC NET FOR CHANNEL ESTIMATION IN MASSIVE MIMO

      Peken, Ture; Tandon, Ravi; Bose, Tamal; Univ Arizona (International Foundation for Telemetering, 2017-10)
      Next generation wireless systems will support higher data rates, improved spectral efficiency, and less latency. Massive multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) is proposed to satisfy these demands. In massive MIMO, many benefits come from employing hundreds of antennas at the base station (BS) and serving dozens of user terminals (UTs) per cell. As the number of antennas increases at the BS, the channel becomes sparse. By exploiting sparse channel in massive MIMO, compressive sensing (CS) methods can be implemented to estimate the channel. In CS methods, the length of pilot sequences can be shortened compared to pilot-based methods. In this paper, a novel channel estimation algorithm based on a CS method called elastic net is proposed. Channel estimation accuracy of pilot-based, lasso, and elastic-net based methods in massive MIMO are compared. It is shown that the elastic-net based method gives the best performance in terms of error for the less pilot symbols and SNR values.
    • DESIGN OF A LONG RANGE COGNITIVE HF RADIO WITH A TUNED COMPACT ANTENNA

      Bose, Tamal; Xin, Hao; Teku, Noel; Gulati, Gitansh; Asadi, Hamed; Vanhoy, Garrett; Abdelrahman, Ahmed H.; Morris, Kevin; Univ Arizona, Dept Elect & Comp Engn; University of Colorado Boulder, Electrical, Computer and Energy Engineering Dept (International Foundation for Telemetering, 2017-10)
      High frequency (HF) communications, ranging from 3 to 30 MHz, are utilized by many radio enthusiasts to conduct transmissions with users across the globe. These communications depend on successfully reflecting signals off of the ionosphere. However, numerous factors (i.e. power level, coding, modulation, etc.), combined with the instability of the ionosphere, can make transmissions over this frequency band unreliable. Thus, an HF communication system design is proposed to offer more robust long range HF communications. The system has a cognitive engine that can determine transmission parameters (i.e. coding, modulation, etc.) capable of providing a high throughput and low bit error rate in various environments. The system also has a low-profile helical antenna that, combined with a matching circuit, is capable of receiving signals over different subsets of the HF band. These two components constitute a system capable of effectively transmitting and receiving signals over the HF band.
    • INEXPENSIVE UHF TRANSCEIVER LEVERAGING COTS COMPONENTS

      Kosbar, Kurt; Chiaventone, Owen; Avola, Kyle; Tuschhoff, Stetson; Missouri University of Science and Technology (International Foundation for Telemetering, 2017-10)
      This paper describes the design of an inexpensive UHF transceiver which leverages some of the recently developed commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) components. The initial goal is to implement digital voice transmit and receive function, although the design can accommodate a wide range of digital communication and telemetry applications. The handheld transceiver transmits 5 watts of power in the 430-435 MHz UHF band. A 1.2 kHz wide GFSK modulation format is used, generated by a Silicon Labs radio chip. The recently released Raspberry Pi Zero processor implements a low bit rate audio coding which conforms to the Codec2 standard. The transceiver fits in a 3 cm x 8 cm x 14 cm volume. It is powered by two 18650 lithium ion cells, and draws approximately 1 watt of power during receive, and 6 watts during transmission.
    • LINK DEPENDENT ADAPTIVE RADIO – DESIGN FOR iNET

      Moazzami, Farzad; Dean, Richard; Alam, Tasmeer; Morgan State University, Electrical and Computer Engineering Department (International Foundation for Telemetering, 2017-10)
      This paper focuses on the design of a simple Time Division Multiple Access (TDMA) signaling structure for the Link Dependent Adaptive Radio (LDAR) prototype wireless radio communication system to meet the timing requirements of the iNET standard. Built for aeronautical telemetry, LDAR adapts its modulation and coding scheme based on the channel condition in real time. In this paper, a simple protocol for transmission of Command Message and Data Message between Ground Station and Test Article is discussed. This protocol includes all analysis for the continuous adaptation of modulation scheme and coding rate to maximize throughput while ensuring a minimum level of link quality. This project was a collaborative effort between Morgan State University and Georgia Tech Research Institute and is a continuation of our previously published work on LDAR.
    • THE TENA AND JMETC SOLUTION FOR TELEMETRY IN DISTRIBUTED RANGES AND FACILITIES

      Hudgins, Gene; Secondine, Juana; TENA Software Development Activity (SDA) (International Foundation for Telemetering, 2017-10)
      TENA and JMETC enable interoperability among Telemetry Instrumentaion (TM) ranges, facilities, and simulations in a timely and cost-efficient manner. TENA provides for real-time system interoperability, as well as interfacing existing range assets, C4ISR systems, and simulations; fostering reuse of range assets and future software systems. JMETC is a distributed, LVC capability which uses a hybrid network architecture; the JSN is used for secret testing and the JMN is the network solution for all classifications and cyber testing. JMETC provides readily available connectivity to the Services' distributed test and training capabilities and simulations, as well as industry resources. TENA and JMETC allow for the most efficient use of current and future TM range resources via range resource integration and remote control. This integration fosters interoperability and reuse within the test and training communities, critical to validate system performance in a highly cost-effective manner.
    • BOEING NW TELEMETRY SYSTEM

      Boeing Test & Evaluation; Gregoire, William C. (International Foundation for Telemetering, 2017-10)
    • USING MLC FLASH TO REDUCE SYSTEM COST IN INDUSTRIAL APPLICATIONS

      Budd, Chris; SMART High Reliability Solutions (International Foundation for Telemetering, 2017-10)
      Storage devices based on Multi-Level Cell (MLC) NAND flash can be found in almost all computer systems except rugged, industrial systems; even though MLC is less expensive and more dense than devices based on standard Single-Level Cell (SLC) NAND flash, MLC’s lower write endurance and lower retention has led system designers to avoid using it. This avoidance is unnecessary in many applications which will never come close to the endurance limits. Furthermore, new processes are leading to storage devices with higher write endurance. System designers should review the specific use-model for their systems and can select MLC-based storage devices when warranted. The result is lower system costs without worry of data loss due to write endurance.
    • HIGH-G SURVIVABILITY OF AN UNPOTTED ON-BOARD RECORDER

      Granitzki, Richard F.; Weinhold, Douglas; US Army Armament Research Development and Engineering Center, Telemetry Branch (International Foundation for Telemetering, 2017-10)
      On-Board Recorders (OBRs) provide developers with data from sensors and computers by storing the data to memory devices contained within it’s on board electronics system. At the expense of recovery, reusable OBRs provide projects with cost savings in terms of upfront non-recurring engineering, unit costs savings, and reduced field support setups. In this paper, the ARRT-158 OBRs used within artillery munitions systems to capture interior and exterior ballistics sensor and mission computer data will be discussed.
    • WRITING BETWEEN THE LINES – THE STORY OF SPECTRUM AGGREGATION

      Wigent, Mark; Laulima Systems (International Foundation for Telemetering, 2017-10)
      In order to meet the increasing demand for spectrum to support future DoD test and evaluation (T&E) requirements in an environment of decreasing spectrum availability, the DoD requires new spectrum aggregation and spectrum management technologies. Advanced radio technologies that sense and aggregate non-contiguous blocks of spectrum into a larger communication channel capable of supporting higher user data rates are needed. Moreover, the T&E community must more effectively manage and use the spectrum that is available to it, and utilize new paradigms in which spectrum is dynamically allocated on a non-interference basis to multiple, concurrent users and in a way that meets both planned and unplanned changes to mission requirements, and real time channel conditions, factoring in both Federal and non-Federal users of spectrum. The objective of the Adaptive Spectrum Aggregation and Management (ASAM) project is to develop technologies that will sense available spectrum, aggregate white space within fragmented frequency bands to create communication channels, and dynamically allocate those channels across multiple range users using algorithms that increase spectrum utilization and efficiency while applying policy constraints. The ASAM project is sponsored by the Test Resource Management Center (TRMC) and was awarded in 2016 through the National Spectrum Consortium. This paper will describe the ASAM project and technical challenges associated with its development.