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dc.contributor.advisorRitter, Leslie S.en
dc.contributor.authorDeBoe, Joseph Charles*
dc.creatorDeBoe, Joseph Charlesen
dc.date.accessioned2018-01-13T01:27:28Z
dc.date.available2018-01-13T01:27:28Z
dc.date.issued2017
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/626308
dc.description.abstractINTRODUCTION: While transitions of care (TOC) programs are known to decrease readmissions for heart failure (HF), significant policy and resource challenges inhibit the implementation of hospital based TOC programs, thus novel models of TOC are urgently needed. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the need and readiness of a private practice based TOC program led by DNP-prepared nurse practitioners. METHODS: In this descriptive study, cardiology providers from a private practice in the Southwest (N=14) participated in a survey on HF TOC. The practice’s electronic medical records (EMR) database was queried for patient demographic data along with other HF measures (N=3175). RESULTS: There were 1,827 females (57.5%) and 1,348 males (42.5%) with the mean age being 75.1 years +/-11.1. The 70-79 year age bracket represented 41.0% of all HF patients. The most common ICD-10 code for HF was [I50.32] Chronic Diastolic Congestive Heart Failure (N=986), which translates into 31.0% of the total HF population. Almost 30% of the providers (N=4) acknowledge that they never document their HF readmissions in the practice’s EMR. Nearly 65% percent of respondents “strongly agree,” that HF patients discharged from the hospital require a specific plan of care, while 86% of providers (N=12) either “somewhat agree” to “strongly agree” in the need for a TOC program for HF patients within their cardiology practice. Over 71% (N=10) of the providers “strongly agree” with a DNP-led TOC program for HF. CONCLUSION: This study provides encouraging results for the future implementation of a cutting edge private cardiology practice based TOC program for HF in Tucson, AZ. The study results clearly indicate the need and readiness for the Tucson-based private practice TOC program for HF. The DNP prepared nurse practitioner is thoroughly prepared to take the lead in designing, implementing and evaluating such a program and this unique role was supported by the practice. Importantly, the results of this study may provide the foundation for future studies examining the effects of private practice based TOC programs for HF.
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en
dc.subjectDoctor of Nursing Practiceen
dc.subjectHeart Failureen
dc.subjectHospital Readmissionsen
dc.subjectTransitions of Careen
dc.titleA Needs Assessment for a Private Practice Based Transitional Care Program for Heart Failureen_US
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen
dc.contributor.committeememberRitter, Leslie S.en
dc.contributor.committeememberMorrison, Helenaen
dc.contributor.committeememberArnold, Michael L.en
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen
thesis.degree.disciplineNursingen
thesis.degree.nameD.N.P.en
refterms.dateFOA2018-07-14T09:22:20Z
html.description.abstractINTRODUCTION: While transitions of care (TOC) programs are known to decrease readmissions for heart failure (HF), significant policy and resource challenges inhibit the implementation of hospital based TOC programs, thus novel models of TOC are urgently needed. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the need and readiness of a private practice based TOC program led by DNP-prepared nurse practitioners. METHODS: In this descriptive study, cardiology providers from a private practice in the Southwest (N=14) participated in a survey on HF TOC. The practice’s electronic medical records (EMR) database was queried for patient demographic data along with other HF measures (N=3175). RESULTS: There were 1,827 females (57.5%) and 1,348 males (42.5%) with the mean age being 75.1 years +/-11.1. The 70-79 year age bracket represented 41.0% of all HF patients. The most common ICD-10 code for HF was [I50.32] Chronic Diastolic Congestive Heart Failure (N=986), which translates into 31.0% of the total HF population. Almost 30% of the providers (N=4) acknowledge that they never document their HF readmissions in the practice’s EMR. Nearly 65% percent of respondents “strongly agree,” that HF patients discharged from the hospital require a specific plan of care, while 86% of providers (N=12) either “somewhat agree” to “strongly agree” in the need for a TOC program for HF patients within their cardiology practice. Over 71% (N=10) of the providers “strongly agree” with a DNP-led TOC program for HF. CONCLUSION: This study provides encouraging results for the future implementation of a cutting edge private cardiology practice based TOC program for HF in Tucson, AZ. The study results clearly indicate the need and readiness for the Tucson-based private practice TOC program for HF. The DNP prepared nurse practitioner is thoroughly prepared to take the lead in designing, implementing and evaluating such a program and this unique role was supported by the practice. Importantly, the results of this study may provide the foundation for future studies examining the effects of private practice based TOC programs for HF.


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