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dc.contributor.authorPerera, Viranga
dc.contributor.authorMead, Chris
dc.contributor.authorBuxner, Sanlyn
dc.contributor.authorLopatto, David
dc.contributor.authorHorodyskyj, Lev
dc.contributor.authorSemken, Steven
dc.contributor.authorAnbar, Ariel D.
dc.date.accessioned2018-01-30T23:19:21Z
dc.date.available2018-01-30T23:19:21Z
dc.date.issued2017-11-16
dc.identifier.citationStudents in Fully Online Programs Report More Positive Attitudes toward Science Than Students in Traditional, In-Person Programs 2017, 16 (4):ar60 Cell Biology Educationen
dc.identifier.issn1931-7913
dc.identifier.issn1931-7913
dc.identifier.doi10.1187/cbe.16-11-0316
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/626425
dc.description.abstractFollowing the growth of online, higher-education courses, academic institutions are now offering fully online degree programs. Yet it is not clear how students who enroll in fully online degree programs are similar to those students who enroll in in-person ("traditional") degree programs. Because previous work has shown students' attitudes toward science can affect their performance in a course, it is valuable to ask how attitudes toward science differ between these two populations. We studied students who completed a fully online astrobiology course. In an analysis of 451 student responses to the Classroom Undergraduate Research Experience survey, we found online program students began the course with a higher scientific sophistication and a higher sense of personal value of science than those in traditional programs. Precourse attitudes also showed some predictive power of course grades among online students, but not for traditional students. Given established relationships between feelings of personal value, intrinsic motivation, and, in turn, traits such as persistence, our results suggest that open-ended or exploration-based learning may be more engaging to online program students due to their pre-existing attitudes. The converse may also be true, that certain pre-existing attitudes among online program students are more detrimental than they are for traditional program students.
dc.description.sponsorshipNASA Astrobiology Institute; National Science Foundation [1225741]; ASU Onlineen
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherAMER SOC CELL BIOLOGYen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.lifescied.org/lookup/doi/10.1187/cbe.16-11-0316en
dc.rights© 2017 V. Perera et al. CBE—Life Sciences Education © 2017 The American Society for Cell Biology. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). It is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License.en
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/
dc.titleStudents in Fully Online Programs Report More Positive Attitudes toward Science Than Students in Traditional, In-Person Programsen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniv Arizona, Dept Teaching Learning & Sociocultural Studiesen
dc.identifier.journalCell Biology Educationen
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item from the UA Faculty Publications collection is made available by the University of Arizona with support from the University of Arizona Libraries. If you have questions, please contact us at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.en
dc.eprint.versionFinal published versionen
refterms.dateFOA2018-09-12T01:06:13Z
html.description.abstractFollowing the growth of online, higher-education courses, academic institutions are now offering fully online degree programs. Yet it is not clear how students who enroll in fully online degree programs are similar to those students who enroll in in-person ("traditional") degree programs. Because previous work has shown students' attitudes toward science can affect their performance in a course, it is valuable to ask how attitudes toward science differ between these two populations. We studied students who completed a fully online astrobiology course. In an analysis of 451 student responses to the Classroom Undergraduate Research Experience survey, we found online program students began the course with a higher scientific sophistication and a higher sense of personal value of science than those in traditional programs. Precourse attitudes also showed some predictive power of course grades among online students, but not for traditional students. Given established relationships between feelings of personal value, intrinsic motivation, and, in turn, traits such as persistence, our results suggest that open-ended or exploration-based learning may be more engaging to online program students due to their pre-existing attitudes. The converse may also be true, that certain pre-existing attitudes among online program students are more detrimental than they are for traditional program students.


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© 2017 V. Perera et al. CBE—Life Sciences Education © 2017 The American Society for Cell Biology. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). It is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License.
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as © 2017 V. Perera et al. CBE—Life Sciences Education © 2017 The American Society for Cell Biology. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). It is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License.