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dc.contributor.authorTsai, Jui-Pin
dc.contributor.authorYeh, Tian-Chyi Jim
dc.contributor.authorCheng, Ching-Chung
dc.contributor.authorZha, Yuanyuan
dc.contributor.authorChang, Liang-Cheng
dc.contributor.authorHwang, Cheinway
dc.contributor.authorWang, Yu-Li
dc.contributor.authorHao, Yonghong
dc.date.accessioned2018-01-31T18:43:50Z
dc.date.available2018-01-31T18:43:50Z
dc.date.issued2017-10
dc.identifier.citationFusion of Time-Lapse Gravity Survey and Hydraulic Tomography for Estimating Spatially Varying Hydraulic Conductivity and Specific Yield Fields 2017, 53 (10):8554 Water Resources Researchen
dc.identifier.issn00431397
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/2017WR020459
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/626482
dc.description.abstractHydraulic conductivity (K) and specific yield (S-y) are important aquifer parameters, pertinent to groundwater resources management and protection. These parameters are commonly estimated through a traditional cross-well pumping test. Employing the traditional approach to obtain detailed spatial distributions of the parameters over a large area is generally formidable. For this reason, this study proposes a stochastic method that integrates hydraulic head and time-lapse gravity based on hydraulic tomography (HT) to efficiently derive the spatial distribution of K and Sy over a large area. This method is demonstrated using several synthetic experiments. Results of these experiments show that the K and Sy fields estimated by joint inversion of the gravity and head data set from sequential injection tests in unconfined aquifers are superior to those from the HT based on head data alone. We attribute this advantage to the mass constraint imposed on HT by gravity measurements. Besides, we find that gravity measurement can detect the change of aquifer's groundwater storage at kilometer scale, as such they can extend HT's effectiveness over greater volumes of the aquifer. Furthermore, we find that the accuracy of the estimated fields is improved as the number of the gravity stations is increased. The gravity station's location, however, has minor effects on the estimates if its effective gravity integration radius covers the well field.
dc.description.sponsorshipMinistry of Science and Technology, Taiwan [MOST 104-2917-I-564-085, 105-2221-E-009-054-MY3, 105-2811-E-009-018]; Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program (SERDP) [ER-1365]; Environmental Security Technology Certification Program (ESTCP) [ER201212]; US National Science Foundation-Division of Earth Sciences [1014594]; Outstanding Oversea Professorship award through Jilin University from Department of Education, China; Global Expert award through Tianjin Normal University from the Thousand Talents Plan of Tianjin Cityen
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherAMER GEOPHYSICAL UNIONen
dc.relation.urlhttp://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/2017WR020459en
dc.rights© 2017. American Geophysical Union. All Rights Reserved.en
dc.titleFusion of Time-Lapse Gravity Survey and Hydraulic Tomography for Estimating Spatially Varying Hydraulic Conductivity and Specific Yield Fieldsen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniv Arizona, Dept Hydrol & Atmospher Scien
dc.identifier.journalWater Resources Researchen
dc.description.note6 month embargo; published online: 30 October 2017en
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item from the UA Faculty Publications collection is made available by the University of Arizona with support from the University of Arizona Libraries. If you have questions, please contact us at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.en
dc.eprint.versionFinal published versionen
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Civil Engineering; National Chiao-Tung University; Hsinchu Taiwan
dc.contributor.institutionKey Laboratory for Water Environment and Resources; Tianjin Normal University; Tianjin China
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Civil Engineering; National Chiao-Tung University; Hsinchu Taiwan
dc.contributor.institutionState Key Laboratory of Water Resources and Hydropower Engineering Science; Wuhan University; Wuhan China
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Civil Engineering; National Chiao-Tung University; Hsinchu Taiwan
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Civil Engineering; National Chiao-Tung University; Hsinchu Taiwan
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Hydrology and Atmospheric Sciences; The University of Arizona; Tucson AZ USA
dc.contributor.institutionKey Laboratory for Water Environment and Resources; Tianjin Normal University; Tianjin China
refterms.dateFOA2018-04-30T00:00:00Z
html.description.abstractHydraulic conductivity (K) and specific yield (S-y) are important aquifer parameters, pertinent to groundwater resources management and protection. These parameters are commonly estimated through a traditional cross-well pumping test. Employing the traditional approach to obtain detailed spatial distributions of the parameters over a large area is generally formidable. For this reason, this study proposes a stochastic method that integrates hydraulic head and time-lapse gravity based on hydraulic tomography (HT) to efficiently derive the spatial distribution of K and Sy over a large area. This method is demonstrated using several synthetic experiments. Results of these experiments show that the K and Sy fields estimated by joint inversion of the gravity and head data set from sequential injection tests in unconfined aquifers are superior to those from the HT based on head data alone. We attribute this advantage to the mass constraint imposed on HT by gravity measurements. Besides, we find that gravity measurement can detect the change of aquifer's groundwater storage at kilometer scale, as such they can extend HT's effectiveness over greater volumes of the aquifer. Furthermore, we find that the accuracy of the estimated fields is improved as the number of the gravity stations is increased. The gravity station's location, however, has minor effects on the estimates if its effective gravity integration radius covers the well field.


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