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dc.contributor.advisorReed, Pamela G.en
dc.contributor.advisorShea, Kimberly D.en
dc.contributor.authorSakalauski, Renee
dc.creatorSakalauski, Reneeen
dc.date.accessioned2018-02-16T19:11:39Z
dc.date.available2018-02-16T19:11:39Z
dc.date.issued2018
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/626623
dc.description.abstractObjective: The purpose of this Doctor of Nursing (DNP) project was to examine providers’ knowledge, attitude, and willingness to use an end-of-life care protocol on an inpatient unit. Background: Cancer is second leading cause of mortality in the United States and despite increases in hospice and palliative care services, many cancer patients at end-of-life are dying in the hospital setting. Research shows the use of an end-of-life care protocol set increases patient care outcomes and increases provider satisfaction with end-of-life care, however; they are not being utilized in many hospitals. The National Consensus Project (NCP) for quality palliative care published evidence based clinical practice guidelines as a set of standards for improving the quality of patient care specifically at end-of-life. There is very little research that examines determinants related to providers’ knowledge, attitudes, and willingness to use an end-of-life care protocol based on the clinical practice guidelines established by the NCP. Methods: Qualitative descriptive research study consisting of a electronic survey questionnaire. Setting: Large cancer facility in Goodyear, Arizona. Participants: Sample of 21 out of 35 providers that included hospitalists, physicians, oncologists, nurse practitioners, and physician assistants. Conclusions: Providers were not knowledgeable regarding the NCP’s clinical practice guidelines for end-of-life care, but their attitudes strongly favor the six suggested practice guidelines for actively dying patients, and they were somewhat willing to adopt these practices. There was also a moderate correlation between the number of years worked with end-of-life patients and the providers’ willingness to learn more about and to use end-of-life care protocols in their practice.
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en
dc.titleProviders’ Knowledge, Attitudes and Willingness to Use an End-of-Life Protocol on an Inpatient Oncology Uniten_US
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen
dc.contributor.committeememberReed, Pamela G.en
dc.contributor.committeememberShea, Kimberly D.en
dc.contributor.committeememberKoithan, Maryen
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen
thesis.degree.disciplineNursingen
thesis.degree.nameD.N.P.en
refterms.dateFOA2018-05-18T02:37:39Z
html.description.abstractObjective: The purpose of this Doctor of Nursing (DNP) project was to examine providers’ knowledge, attitude, and willingness to use an end-of-life care protocol on an inpatient unit. Background: Cancer is second leading cause of mortality in the United States and despite increases in hospice and palliative care services, many cancer patients at end-of-life are dying in the hospital setting. Research shows the use of an end-of-life care protocol set increases patient care outcomes and increases provider satisfaction with end-of-life care, however; they are not being utilized in many hospitals. The National Consensus Project (NCP) for quality palliative care published evidence based clinical practice guidelines as a set of standards for improving the quality of patient care specifically at end-of-life. There is very little research that examines determinants related to providers’ knowledge, attitudes, and willingness to use an end-of-life care protocol based on the clinical practice guidelines established by the NCP. Methods: Qualitative descriptive research study consisting of a electronic survey questionnaire. Setting: Large cancer facility in Goodyear, Arizona. Participants: Sample of 21 out of 35 providers that included hospitalists, physicians, oncologists, nurse practitioners, and physician assistants. Conclusions: Providers were not knowledgeable regarding the NCP’s clinical practice guidelines for end-of-life care, but their attitudes strongly favor the six suggested practice guidelines for actively dying patients, and they were somewhat willing to adopt these practices. There was also a moderate correlation between the number of years worked with end-of-life patients and the providers’ willingness to learn more about and to use end-of-life care protocols in their practice.


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