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dc.contributor.advisorLeRoy, Brian J.en
dc.contributor.authorHuang, Shengqiang*
dc.creatorHuang, Shengqiangen
dc.date.accessioned2018-02-21T16:21:54Z
dc.date.available2018-02-21T16:21:54Z
dc.date.issued2018
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/626686
dc.description.abstractThe ability to isolate single atomic layers of van der Waals materials has led to renewed interest in the electronic and optical properties of these materials as they can be fundamentally different at the monolayer limit. Moreover, these 2D crystals can be assembled together layer by layer, with controllable sequence and orientation, to form artificial materials that exhibit new features that are not found in monolayers nor bulk. Twisted bilayer graphene is one such prototype system formed by two monolayer graphene layers placed on top of each other with a twist angle between their lattices, whose electronic band structure depends on the twist angle. This thesis presents the efforts to explore the electronic and optical properties of twisted bilayer graphene by Raman spectroscopy and scanning tunneling microscopy measurements. We first synthesize twisted bilayer graphene with various twist angles via chemical vapor deposition. Using a combination of scanning tunneling microscopy and Raman spectroscopy, the twist angles are determined. The strength of the Raman G peak is sensitive to the electronic band structure of twisted bilayer graphene and therefore we use this peak to monitor changes upon doping. Our results demonstrate the ability to modify the electronic and optical properties of twisted bilayer graphene with doping. We also fabricate twisted bilayer graphene by controllable stacking of two graphene monolayers with a dry transfer technique. For twist angles smaller than one degree, many body interactions play an important role. It requires eight electrons per moire unit cell to fill up each band instead of four electrons in the case of a larger twist angle. For twist angles smaller than 0.4 degree, a network of domain walls separating AB and BA stacking regions forms, which are predicted to host topologically protected helical states. Using scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy, these states are confirmed to appear on the domain walls when inversion symmetry is broken with an external electric field. We observe a double-line profile of these states on the domain walls, only occurring when the AB and BA regions are gaped. These states give rise to channels that could transport charge in a dissipationless manner making twisted bilayer graphene a promising platform to realize controllable topological networks for future applications.
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en
dc.subjectDopingen
dc.subjectMany body interactionsen
dc.subjectRaman spectroscopyen
dc.subjectScanning tunneling microscopyen
dc.subjectTwisted bilayer grapheneen
dc.subjectvan der Waals materialsen
dc.titleElectronic and Optical Properties of Twisted Bilayer Grapheneen_US
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen
dc.contributor.committeememberLeRoy, Brian J.en
dc.contributor.committeememberSandhu, Arvinderen
dc.contributor.committeememberStafford, Charlesen
dc.contributor.committeememberWang, Weigangen
dc.contributor.committeememberSchaibley, Johnen
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen
thesis.degree.disciplinePhysicsen
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en
refterms.dateFOA2018-04-25T17:43:52Z
html.description.abstractThe ability to isolate single atomic layers of van der Waals materials has led to renewed interest in the electronic and optical properties of these materials as they can be fundamentally different at the monolayer limit. Moreover, these 2D crystals can be assembled together layer by layer, with controllable sequence and orientation, to form artificial materials that exhibit new features that are not found in monolayers nor bulk. Twisted bilayer graphene is one such prototype system formed by two monolayer graphene layers placed on top of each other with a twist angle between their lattices, whose electronic band structure depends on the twist angle. This thesis presents the efforts to explore the electronic and optical properties of twisted bilayer graphene by Raman spectroscopy and scanning tunneling microscopy measurements. We first synthesize twisted bilayer graphene with various twist angles via chemical vapor deposition. Using a combination of scanning tunneling microscopy and Raman spectroscopy, the twist angles are determined. The strength of the Raman G peak is sensitive to the electronic band structure of twisted bilayer graphene and therefore we use this peak to monitor changes upon doping. Our results demonstrate the ability to modify the electronic and optical properties of twisted bilayer graphene with doping. We also fabricate twisted bilayer graphene by controllable stacking of two graphene monolayers with a dry transfer technique. For twist angles smaller than one degree, many body interactions play an important role. It requires eight electrons per moire unit cell to fill up each band instead of four electrons in the case of a larger twist angle. For twist angles smaller than 0.4 degree, a network of domain walls separating AB and BA stacking regions forms, which are predicted to host topologically protected helical states. Using scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy, these states are confirmed to appear on the domain walls when inversion symmetry is broken with an external electric field. We observe a double-line profile of these states on the domain walls, only occurring when the AB and BA regions are gaped. These states give rise to channels that could transport charge in a dissipationless manner making twisted bilayer graphene a promising platform to realize controllable topological networks for future applications.


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