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dc.contributor.advisorGoldsmith, Melissaen
dc.contributor.authorRoth, Brianna Marie
dc.creatorRoth, Brianna Marieen
dc.date.accessioned2018-02-22T20:48:18Z
dc.date.available2018-02-22T20:48:18Z
dc.date.issued2017-12
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/626735
dc.description.abstractThis paper explores the most current research on the identified gap in breastfeeding initiation and duration rates among low-income mothers when compared with the general population. Women that fall into the “low-income” bracket and who participate in the WIC program are nearly 12% less likely to initiate breastfeeding than the general population, and less likely to continue for a year (Hedberg, 2013). The articles examined discuss the barriers and supportive measures that contribute to or hinder breastfeeding success among low-income prenatal and postpartum mothers. The articles focus on providers knowledge and attitudes toward breastfeeding in relation to the promotion of breastfeeding among low-income women, interventions to extend the duration of breastfeeding once initiated, strategies to encourage best-practice uptake among nursing staff, ways to motivate low-income women to breastfeeding over formula feed, and the benefits of Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) Food and Nutrition Service involvement. These articles further discuss the impact women’s confidence regarding breastfeeding has on its success, as well as low-income mother’s experience and perceptions of both professional and peer breastfeeding support. Beyond the review of current literature, this paper will identify best-practice recommendations, a proposed implementation plan, and a proposed evaluation of the implementation process.
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en
dc.titleBest practice recommendations to support breastfeeding among low-income womenen_US
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen
thesis.degree.levelbachelorsen
thesis.degree.disciplineHonors Collegeen
thesis.degree.disciplineNursingen
thesis.degree.nameB.S.N.en
refterms.dateFOA2018-09-12T01:49:03Z
html.description.abstractThis paper explores the most current research on the identified gap in breastfeeding initiation and duration rates among low-income mothers when compared with the general population. Women that fall into the “low-income” bracket and who participate in the WIC program are nearly 12% less likely to initiate breastfeeding than the general population, and less likely to continue for a year (Hedberg, 2013). The articles examined discuss the barriers and supportive measures that contribute to or hinder breastfeeding success among low-income prenatal and postpartum mothers. The articles focus on providers knowledge and attitudes toward breastfeeding in relation to the promotion of breastfeeding among low-income women, interventions to extend the duration of breastfeeding once initiated, strategies to encourage best-practice uptake among nursing staff, ways to motivate low-income women to breastfeeding over formula feed, and the benefits of Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) Food and Nutrition Service involvement. These articles further discuss the impact women’s confidence regarding breastfeeding has on its success, as well as low-income mother’s experience and perceptions of both professional and peer breastfeeding support. Beyond the review of current literature, this paper will identify best-practice recommendations, a proposed implementation plan, and a proposed evaluation of the implementation process.


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