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dc.contributor.advisorBrooks, Paul D.en
dc.contributor.authorKlasner, Laura M.en
dc.creatorKlasner, Laura M.en
dc.date.accessioned2018-02-28T19:21:28Z
dc.date.available2018-02-28T19:21:28Z
dc.date.issued2006
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/626916
dc.description.abstractPre-monsoon (June) and monsoon (August) sampling campaigns were conducted on a gaining and a losing reach in the San Pedro River in 2005 to quantify the effects of variability in hydrologic conditions on carbon and nitrogen cycling in an N-limited semi arid stream. Nutrient concentrations decrease along the gaining reach, while new groundwater inputs, rapid N03-N uptake and net production of organic DOC and DON occurs. In contrast, the losing reach experiences little spatial variability suggesting the presence of a large, well-mixed alluvial aquifer as a single source. However, so/ concentrations and S04:Cl ratios decrease between gaining and losing systems with isotope mixing models indicating uptake of S04 2- and suggesting biological sulfate reduction between reaches. Diurnal cycles of increases in nighttime stage, er and nutrients indicate change in riparian vegetation transpiration demand and bank drainage of relatively N rich water at night. Monsoon stream flow becomes a roughly equal mixture of groundwater and monsoon precipitation with nutrient concentrations exhibiting little spatial variability. However, a decrease in DON concentrations and DON between the two reaches indicates nutrient processing occurs at much larger spatial scales. These data illustrate several examples of how hydro logic variability at different spatial and temporal scales controls nutrient fluxes and transformations.
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en
dc.titleThe influence of spatial and temporal hydrologic variability on nutrient fluxes and transformations, San Pedro River, Arizona, USAen_US
dc.typetexten
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen
thesis.degree.levelmastersen
dc.contributor.committeememberBrooks, Paul D.en
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen
thesis.degree.disciplineHydrology and Water Resourcesen
thesis.degree.nameM.S.en
dc.description.noteDigitized from paper copies provided by the Department of Hydrology & Atmospheric Sciences.en
refterms.dateFOA2018-04-26T01:23:31Z
html.description.abstractPre-monsoon (June) and monsoon (August) sampling campaigns were conducted on a gaining and a losing reach in the San Pedro River in 2005 to quantify the effects of variability in hydrologic conditions on carbon and nitrogen cycling in an N-limited semi arid stream. Nutrient concentrations decrease along the gaining reach, while new groundwater inputs, rapid N03-N uptake and net production of organic DOC and DON occurs. In contrast, the losing reach experiences little spatial variability suggesting the presence of a large, well-mixed alluvial aquifer as a single source. However, so/ concentrations and S04:Cl ratios decrease between gaining and losing systems with isotope mixing models indicating uptake of S04 2- and suggesting biological sulfate reduction between reaches. Diurnal cycles of increases in nighttime stage, er and nutrients indicate change in riparian vegetation transpiration demand and bank drainage of relatively N rich water at night. Monsoon stream flow becomes a roughly equal mixture of groundwater and monsoon precipitation with nutrient concentrations exhibiting little spatial variability. However, a decrease in DON concentrations and DON between the two reaches indicates nutrient processing occurs at much larger spatial scales. These data illustrate several examples of how hydro logic variability at different spatial and temporal scales controls nutrient fluxes and transformations.


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