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dc.contributor.advisorConklin, Martha H.en
dc.contributor.authorRobbins, Elizabeth
dc.creatorRobbins, Elizabethen
dc.date.accessioned2018-03-01T23:25:42Z
dc.date.available2018-03-01T23:25:42Z
dc.date.issued2003
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/626939
dc.description.abstractAquatic plants can be significant sinks for dissolved metals in metal contaminated streams. This study found water speedwell (Veronica anagallis aquatica) growing in Pinal Creek both bio-accumulates metals (Mn, Zn, Ni, and Co) and provides surfaces for metal precipitation. Analysis of plant tissue found that roots accumulate up to 80 g Mn/kg dry root, with the majority of metals associated with the external plant surface. Fine sediments around water speedwell colonies have 2-10 times higher metal concentrations than surrounding sediments. SEM photos of the plant surface show clumps of manganese oxides associated with what appear to be manganese-oxidizing bacteria. First order metal removal rates by water speedwell of 1 x 10^-3, 2 x 10^-3, and 5 x 10^-3 per hour for manganese, nickel, and cobalt, respectively were estimated by laboratory experiments. Water speedwell enhances metal removal in streams by providing surfaces conducive for metal oxyhydroxides precipitation.
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en
dc.titleThe Role of Water Speedwell in the Distribution and Rates of Metal Removal from Pinal Creek, Near Globe, Arizonaen_US
dc.typetexten
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen
thesis.degree.levelmastersen
dc.contributor.committeememberConklin, Martha H.en
dc.contributor.committeememberHarvey, Judson W.en
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen
thesis.degree.disciplineHydrology and Water Resourcesen
thesis.degree.nameM.S.en
dc.description.noteDigitized from paper copies provided by the Department of Hydrology & Atmospheric Sciences.en
refterms.dateFOA2018-09-13T20:27:41Z
html.description.abstractAquatic plants can be significant sinks for dissolved metals in metal contaminated streams. This study found water speedwell (Veronica anagallis aquatica) growing in Pinal Creek both bio-accumulates metals (Mn, Zn, Ni, and Co) and provides surfaces for metal precipitation. Analysis of plant tissue found that roots accumulate up to 80 g Mn/kg dry root, with the majority of metals associated with the external plant surface. Fine sediments around water speedwell colonies have 2-10 times higher metal concentrations than surrounding sediments. SEM photos of the plant surface show clumps of manganese oxides associated with what appear to be manganese-oxidizing bacteria. First order metal removal rates by water speedwell of 1 x 10^-3, 2 x 10^-3, and 5 x 10^-3 per hour for manganese, nickel, and cobalt, respectively were estimated by laboratory experiments. Water speedwell enhances metal removal in streams by providing surfaces conducive for metal oxyhydroxides precipitation.


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Appendix E: Pinal Creek Pictures

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