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dc.contributor.authorBiller, Beth A.
dc.contributor.authorVos, Johanna
dc.contributor.authorBuenzli, Esther
dc.contributor.authorAllers, Katelyn
dc.contributor.authorBonnefoy, Mickaël
dc.contributor.authorCharnay, Benjamin
dc.contributor.authorBézard, Bruno
dc.contributor.authorAllard, France
dc.contributor.authorHomeier, Derek
dc.contributor.authorBonavita, Mariangela
dc.contributor.authorBrandner, Wolfgang
dc.contributor.authorCrossfield, Ian
dc.contributor.authorDupuy, Trent J.
dc.contributor.authorHenning, Thomas
dc.contributor.authorKopytova, Taisiya
dc.contributor.authorLiu, Michael C.
dc.contributor.authorManjavacas, Elena
dc.contributor.authorSchlieder, Joshua
dc.date.accessioned2018-03-13T22:47:17Z
dc.date.available2018-03-13T22:47:17Z
dc.date.issued2018-01-31
dc.identifier.citationSimultaneous Multiwavelength Variability Characterization of the Free-floating Planetary-mass Object PSO J318.5−22 2018, 155 (2):95 The Astronomical Journalen
dc.identifier.issn1538-3881
dc.identifier.doi10.3847/1538-3881/aaa5a6
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/627034
dc.description.abstractWe present simultaneous Hubble Space Telescope (HST) WFC3+Spitzer IRAC variability monitoring for the highly variable young (similar to 20 Myr) planetary-mass object PSO J318.5-22. Our simultaneous HST + Spitzer observations covered approximately two rotation periods with Spitzer and most of a rotation period with the HST. We derive a period of 8.6. +/-. 0.1 hr from the Spitzer light curve. Combining this period with the measuredvsinifor this object, we find an inclination of 56 degrees.2. +/-. 8 degrees.1. We measure peak-to-trough variability amplitudes of 3.4%. +/-. 0.1% for Spitzer Channel 2 and 4.4%-5.8% (typical 68% confidence errors of similar to 0.3%) in the near-IR bands (1.07-1.67 mu m) covered by the WFC3 G141 prism-the mid-IR variability amplitude for PSO J318.5-22 is one of the highest variability amplitudes measured in the mid-IR for any brown dwarf or planetary-mass object. Additionally, we detect phase offsets ranging from 200 degrees to 210 degrees (typical error of similar to 4 degrees) between synthesized near-IR light curves and the Spitzer mid-IR light curve, likely indicating depth-dependent longitudinal atmospheric structure in this atmosphere. The detection of similar variability amplitudes in wide spectral bands relative to absorption features suggests that the driver of the variability may be inhomogeneous clouds (perhaps a patchy haze layer over thick clouds), as opposed to hot spots or compositional inhomogeneities at the top-of-atmosphere level.
dc.description.sponsorshipNASA [NAS 5-26555]; NASA through a grant from the Space Telescope Science Institute [14188]; Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA [NAS 5-26555]; STFC [ST/J001422/1]en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherIOP PUBLISHING LTDen
dc.relation.urlhttp://stacks.iop.org/1538-3881/155/i=2/a=95?key=crossref.02cf051112075fc10644156bed318184en
dc.rights© 2018. The American Astronomical Society. All rights reserved.en
dc.subjectbrown dwarfsen
dc.subjectplanets and satellites: atmospheresen
dc.subjectplanets and satellites: gaseous planetsen
dc.titleSimultaneous Multiwavelength Variability Characterization of the Free-floating Planetary-mass Object PSO J318.5−22en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniv Arizona, Steward Observen
dc.identifier.journalThe Astronomical Journalen
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item from the UA Faculty Publications collection is made available by the University of Arizona with support from the University of Arizona Libraries. If you have questions, please contact us at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.en
dc.eprint.versionFinal published versionen
refterms.dateFOA2018-09-13T22:38:03Z
html.description.abstractWe present simultaneous Hubble Space Telescope (HST) WFC3+Spitzer IRAC variability monitoring for the highly variable young (similar to 20 Myr) planetary-mass object PSO J318.5-22. Our simultaneous HST + Spitzer observations covered approximately two rotation periods with Spitzer and most of a rotation period with the HST. We derive a period of 8.6. +/-. 0.1 hr from the Spitzer light curve. Combining this period with the measuredvsinifor this object, we find an inclination of 56 degrees.2. +/-. 8 degrees.1. We measure peak-to-trough variability amplitudes of 3.4%. +/-. 0.1% for Spitzer Channel 2 and 4.4%-5.8% (typical 68% confidence errors of similar to 0.3%) in the near-IR bands (1.07-1.67 mu m) covered by the WFC3 G141 prism-the mid-IR variability amplitude for PSO J318.5-22 is one of the highest variability amplitudes measured in the mid-IR for any brown dwarf or planetary-mass object. Additionally, we detect phase offsets ranging from 200 degrees to 210 degrees (typical error of similar to 4 degrees) between synthesized near-IR light curves and the Spitzer mid-IR light curve, likely indicating depth-dependent longitudinal atmospheric structure in this atmosphere. The detection of similar variability amplitudes in wide spectral bands relative to absorption features suggests that the driver of the variability may be inhomogeneous clouds (perhaps a patchy haze layer over thick clouds), as opposed to hot spots or compositional inhomogeneities at the top-of-atmosphere level.


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