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dc.contributor.authorKoll, Daniel D. B.
dc.contributor.authorKomacek, Thaddeus D.
dc.date.accessioned2018-03-13T23:15:40Z
dc.date.available2018-03-13T23:15:40Z
dc.date.issued2018-01-31
dc.identifier.citationAtmospheric Circulations of Hot Jupiters as Planetary Heat Engines 2018, 853 (2):133 The Astrophysical Journalen
dc.identifier.issn1538-4357
dc.identifier.doi10.3847/1538-4357/aaa3de
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/627038
dc.description.abstractBecause of their intense incident stellar irradiation and likely tidally locked spin states, hot Jupiters are expected to have wind speeds that approach or exceed the speed of sound. In this work, we develop a theory to explain the magnitude of these winds. We model hot Jupiters as planetary heat engines and show that hot Jupiters are always less efficient than an ideal Carnot engine. Next, we demonstrate that our predicted wind speeds match those from three-dimensional numerical simulations over a broad range of parameters. Finally, we use our theory to evaluate how well different drag mechanisms can match the wind speeds observed with Doppler spectroscopy for HD 189733b and HD 209458b. We find that magnetic drag is potentially too weak to match the observations for HD 189733b, but is compatible with the observations for HD 209458b. In contrast, shear instabilities and/or shocks are compatible with both observations. Furthermore, the two mechanisms predict different wind speed trends for hotter and colder planets than currently observed. As a result, we propose that a wider range of Doppler observations could reveal multiple drag mechanisms at play across different hot Jupiters.
dc.description.sponsorshipJames McDonnell Foundation postdoctoral fellowship; NASA Earth and Space Science fellowship; Heising-Simons Foundationen
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherIOP PUBLISHING LTDen
dc.relation.urlhttp://stacks.iop.org/0004-637X/853/i=2/a=133?key=crossref.a9221961fcb02a76bd2bb360af5d3c8ben
dc.rights© 2018. The American Astronomical Society. All rights reserved.en
dc.subjecthydrodynamicsen
dc.subjectmethods: analyticalen
dc.subjectmethods: numericalen
dc.subjectplanets and satellites: atmospheresen
dc.subjectplanets and satellites: individual (HD 189733b, HD 209458b)en
dc.titleAtmospheric Circulations of Hot Jupiters as Planetary Heat Enginesen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniv Arizona, Lunar & Planetary Laben
dc.contributor.departmentUniv Arizona, Dept Planetary Scien
dc.identifier.journalThe Astrophysical Journalen
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item from the UA Faculty Publications collection is made available by the University of Arizona with support from the University of Arizona Libraries. If you have questions, please contact us at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.en
dc.eprint.versionFinal published versionen
refterms.dateFOA2018-06-25T03:59:45Z
html.description.abstractBecause of their intense incident stellar irradiation and likely tidally locked spin states, hot Jupiters are expected to have wind speeds that approach or exceed the speed of sound. In this work, we develop a theory to explain the magnitude of these winds. We model hot Jupiters as planetary heat engines and show that hot Jupiters are always less efficient than an ideal Carnot engine. Next, we demonstrate that our predicted wind speeds match those from three-dimensional numerical simulations over a broad range of parameters. Finally, we use our theory to evaluate how well different drag mechanisms can match the wind speeds observed with Doppler spectroscopy for HD 189733b and HD 209458b. We find that magnetic drag is potentially too weak to match the observations for HD 189733b, but is compatible with the observations for HD 209458b. In contrast, shear instabilities and/or shocks are compatible with both observations. Furthermore, the two mechanisms predict different wind speed trends for hotter and colder planets than currently observed. As a result, we propose that a wider range of Doppler observations could reveal multiple drag mechanisms at play across different hot Jupiters.


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