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dc.contributor.authorAlam, Now Behar
dc.date.accessioned2018-03-28T22:12:10Z
dc.date.available2018-03-28T22:12:10Z
dc.date.issued2018-03-28
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/627146
dc.descriptionA Thesis submitted to The University of Arizona College of Medicine - Phoenix in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the Degree of Doctor of Medicine.en
dc.description.abstractBackground: Studies estimating the current prevalence rates and future demographics of being overweight or obese and non-communicable diseases initially demonstrated Western countries had the highest rates of obesity. Now, obesity is more prevalent in urban populations of Africa, Central and South America, Asia, and Caribbean and Pacific Islands. Objective: Determine if any differences exist with the NCD rates in urbanized versus rural populations in developing countries. Methods: Using PubMed, a thorough review of the literature was conducted using various search terms related to the research topic. Results: To assess for differences between the urban and rural populations, the effect size using Cohen’s d was utilized to measure the size of associations or differences. Conclusion: Cross-sectional and observational studies comparing BMI values, blood pressure levels, cholesterol levels, and blood glucose levels have addressed if living in urban versus rural areas increases the prevalence of NCDs related to these variables. Urban populations and living a sedentary lifestyle does increase the likelihood of being overweight or obese, hypertension, hypercholesterolemia, but not diabetes.
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the College of Medicine - Phoenix, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.subject.meshDeveloping Countriesen
dc.subject.meshNoncommunicable Diseasesen
dc.subject.meshRural Healthen
dc.subject.meshRural Populationsen
dc.subject.meshUrban Healthen
dc.subject.meshUrban Populationsen
dc.titleNon-Communicable Disease (NCD) Rates in Urbanized versus Rural Populations in Developing Countries.en_US
dc.typetext; Electronic Thesisen
dc.contributor.departmentThe University of Arizona College of Medicine - Phoenixen
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item is part of the College of Medicine - Phoenix Scholarly Projects 2018 collection. For more information, contact the Phoenix Biomedical Campus Library at pbc-library@email.arizona.edu.en_US
dc.contributor.mentorConklin, Codyen
refterms.dateFOA2018-09-12T07:07:02Z
html.description.abstractBackground: Studies estimating the current prevalence rates and future demographics of being overweight or obese and non-communicable diseases initially demonstrated Western countries had the highest rates of obesity. Now, obesity is more prevalent in urban populations of Africa, Central and South America, Asia, and Caribbean and Pacific Islands. Objective: Determine if any differences exist with the NCD rates in urbanized versus rural populations in developing countries. Methods: Using PubMed, a thorough review of the literature was conducted using various search terms related to the research topic. Results: To assess for differences between the urban and rural populations, the effect size using Cohen’s d was utilized to measure the size of associations or differences. Conclusion: Cross-sectional and observational studies comparing BMI values, blood pressure levels, cholesterol levels, and blood glucose levels have addressed if living in urban versus rural areas increases the prevalence of NCDs related to these variables. Urban populations and living a sedentary lifestyle does increase the likelihood of being overweight or obese, hypertension, hypercholesterolemia, but not diabetes.


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