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dc.contributor.authorBlank, Tiana
dc.date.accessioned2018-03-28T22:49:00Z
dc.date.available2018-03-28T22:49:00Z
dc.date.issued2018-03-28
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/627148
dc.descriptionA Thesis submitted to The University of Arizona College of Medicine - Phoenix in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the Degree of Doctor of Medicine.en
dc.description.abstractThe bacteria staphylococcus aureus is the most common etiology of acute hematogenous osteomyelitis (AHO) in healthy pediatric patients, accounting for 70-90% of cases. • AHO occurs at a rate of 1/10,000 pediatric patients/year. • Increasing prevalence of community-acquired methicillin resistant staph aureus (MRSA) is leading to a concurrent rise of such invasive pediatric infections in the US. • MRSA AHO on average have longer hospital stays, more febrile days, longer antibiotic therapy, and increase in overall complications vs. methicillin sensitive staph aureus (MSSA). • There is a lack of data on the functional outcome of these patients beyond 2 years post index infection. • Goal of study: compare treatment and midterm (2 years post index infection) functional outcomes between patients with MRSA vs. MSSA infections, and localized vs. disseminated infections. • Hypothesis: treatment and outcomes between MRSA and MSSA, and localized and disseminated, will be different, specifically that MRSA and disseminated will have worse midterm functional outcomes
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the College of Medicine - Phoenix, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.subject.meshMethicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureusen
dc.subject.meshOsteomyelitisen
dc.titleComparative Mid-term Outcomes of Pediatric Hematogenous Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and Methicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus osteomyelitisen_US
dc.typetext; Electronic Thesisen
dc.contributor.departmentThe University of Arizona College of Medicine - Phoenixen
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item is part of the College of Medicine - Phoenix Scholarly Projects 2018 collection. For more information, contact the Phoenix Biomedical Campus Library at pbc-library@email.arizona.edu.en_US
dc.contributor.mentorBelthur, Mohanen
refterms.dateFOA2018-09-12T07:07:14Z
html.description.abstractThe bacteria staphylococcus aureus is the most common etiology of acute hematogenous osteomyelitis (AHO) in healthy pediatric patients, accounting for 70-90% of cases. • AHO occurs at a rate of 1/10,000 pediatric patients/year. • Increasing prevalence of community-acquired methicillin resistant staph aureus (MRSA) is leading to a concurrent rise of such invasive pediatric infections in the US. • MRSA AHO on average have longer hospital stays, more febrile days, longer antibiotic therapy, and increase in overall complications vs. methicillin sensitive staph aureus (MSSA). • There is a lack of data on the functional outcome of these patients beyond 2 years post index infection. • Goal of study: compare treatment and midterm (2 years post index infection) functional outcomes between patients with MRSA vs. MSSA infections, and localized vs. disseminated infections. • Hypothesis: treatment and outcomes between MRSA and MSSA, and localized and disseminated, will be different, specifically that MRSA and disseminated will have worse midterm functional outcomes


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