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dc.contributor.authorMariën, Joachim
dc.contributor.authorSluydts, Vincent
dc.contributor.authorBorremans, Benny
dc.contributor.authorGryseels, Sophie
dc.contributor.authorVanden Broecke, Bram
dc.contributor.authorSabuni, Christopher A.
dc.contributor.authorKatakweba, Abdul A. S.
dc.contributor.authorMulungu, Loth S.
dc.contributor.authorGünther, Stephan
dc.contributor.authorde Bellocq, Joëlle Goüy
dc.contributor.authorMassawe, Apia W.
dc.contributor.authorLeirs, Herwig
dc.date.accessioned2018-03-30T17:31:49Z
dc.date.available2018-03-30T17:31:49Z
dc.date.issued2018-02-08
dc.identifier.citationArenavirus infection correlates with lower survival of its natural rodent host in a long-term capture-mark-recapture study 2018, 11 (1) Parasites & Vectorsen
dc.identifier.issn1756-3305
dc.identifier.pmid29422075
dc.identifier.doi10.1186/s13071-018-2674-2
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/627157
dc.description.abstractBackground: Parasite evolution is hypothesized to select for levels of parasite virulence that maximise transmission success. When host population densities fluctuate, low levels of virulence with limited impact on the host are expected, as this should increase the likelihood of surviving periods of low host density. We examined the effects of Morogoro arenavirus on the survival and recapture probability of multimammate mice (Mastomys natalensis) using a seven-year capture-mark-recapture time series. Mastomys natalensis is the natural host of Morogoro virus and is known for its strong seasonal density fluctuations. Results: Antibody presence was negatively correlated with survival probability (effect size: 5-8% per month depending on season) but positively with recapture probability (effect size: 8%). Conclusions: The small negative correlation between host survival probability and antibody presence suggests that either the virus has a negative effect on host condition, or that hosts with lower survival probability are more likely to obtain Morogoro virus infection, for example due to particular behavioural or immunological traits. The latter hypothesis is supported by the positive correlation between antibody status and recapture probability which suggests that risky behaviour might increase the probability of becoming infected.
dc.description.sponsorshipUniversity of Antwerp [GOA BOF FFB3567]; Antwerp study centre for disease (ASCID) [GOA BOF FFB3567]; INCO-DEV grant [ICA4-CT2002-10050]; German Research Foundation (Focus Programs from Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft) [GU 883/3-1, GU 883/3-2]; European Union's Horizon research and innovation programme under the Marie Sklodowska-Curie grant [707840]en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherBIOMED CENTRAL LTDen
dc.relation.urlhttps://parasitesandvectors.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s13071-018-2674-2en
dc.rights© The Author(s). 2018 Open Access This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.en
dc.subjectArenavirusen
dc.subjectMorogoro virusen
dc.subjectSurvival analysisen
dc.subjectCapture-mark-recaptureen
dc.subjectHost-parasite interactionen
dc.titleArenavirus infection correlates with lower survival of its natural rodent host in a long-term capture-mark-recapture studyen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniv Arizona, Dept Ecol & Evolutionary Biolen
dc.identifier.journalParasites & Vectorsen
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item from the UA Faculty Publications collection is made available by the University of Arizona with support from the University of Arizona Libraries. If you have questions, please contact us at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.en
dc.eprint.versionFinal published versionen
refterms.dateFOA2018-06-24T12:59:37Z
html.description.abstractBackground: Parasite evolution is hypothesized to select for levels of parasite virulence that maximise transmission success. When host population densities fluctuate, low levels of virulence with limited impact on the host are expected, as this should increase the likelihood of surviving periods of low host density. We examined the effects of Morogoro arenavirus on the survival and recapture probability of multimammate mice (Mastomys natalensis) using a seven-year capture-mark-recapture time series. Mastomys natalensis is the natural host of Morogoro virus and is known for its strong seasonal density fluctuations. Results: Antibody presence was negatively correlated with survival probability (effect size: 5-8% per month depending on season) but positively with recapture probability (effect size: 8%). Conclusions: The small negative correlation between host survival probability and antibody presence suggests that either the virus has a negative effect on host condition, or that hosts with lower survival probability are more likely to obtain Morogoro virus infection, for example due to particular behavioural or immunological traits. The latter hypothesis is supported by the positive correlation between antibody status and recapture probability which suggests that risky behaviour might increase the probability of becoming infected.


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