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dc.contributor.authorWilson, Stephen M.
dc.contributor.authorEriksson, Dana K.
dc.contributor.authorSchneck, Sarah M.
dc.contributor.authorLucanie, Jillian M.
dc.date.accessioned2018-03-30T18:28:17Z
dc.date.available2018-03-30T18:28:17Z
dc.date.issued2018-02-09
dc.identifier.citationA quick aphasia battery for efficient, reliable, and multidimensional assessment of language function 2018, 13 (2):e0192773 PLOS ONEen
dc.identifier.issn1932-6203
dc.identifier.pmid29425241
dc.identifier.doi10.1371/journal.pone.0192773
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/627164
dc.description.abstractThis paper describes a quick aphasia battery (QAB) that aims to provide a reliable and multidimensional assessment of language function in about a quarter of an hour, bridging the gap between comprehensive batteries that are time-consuming to administer, and rapid screening instruments that provide limited detail regarding individual profiles of deficits. The QAB is made up of eight subtests, each comprising sets of items that probe different language domains, vary in difficulty, and are scored with a graded system to maximize the informativeness of each item. From the eight subtests, eight summary measures are derived, which constitute a multidimensional profile of language function, quantifying strengths and weaknesses across core language domains. The QAB was administered to 28 individuals with acute stroke and aphasia, 25 individuals with acute stroke but no aphasia, 16 individuals with chronic post-stroke aphasia, and 14 healthy controls. The patients with chronic post-stroke aphasia were tested 3 times each and scored independently by 2 raters to establish test-retest and inter-rater reliability. The Western Aphasia Battery (WAB) was also administered to these patients to assess concurrent validity. We found that all QAB summary measures were sensitive to aphasic deficits in the two groups with aphasia. All measures showed good or excellent test-retest reliability (overall summary measure: intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) = 0.98), and excellent inter-rater reliability (overall summary measure: ICC = 0.99). Sensitivity and specificity for diagnosis of aphasia (relative to clinical impression) were 0.91 and 0.95 respectively. All QAB measures were highly correlated with corresponding WAB measures where available. Individual patients showed distinct profiles of spared and impaired function across different language domains. In sum, the QAB efficiently and reliably characterized individual profiles of language deficits.
dc.description.sponsorshipNational Institutes of Health (National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders) [R01 DC013270, R21 DC016080]en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherPUBLIC LIBRARY SCIENCEen
dc.relation.urlhttp://dx.plos.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0192773en
dc.rights© 2018 Wilson et al. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License.en
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.titleA quick aphasia battery for efficient, reliable, and multidimensional assessment of language functionen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniv Arizona, Dept Speech Language & Hearing Scien
dc.identifier.journalPLOS ONEen
dc.description.noteOpen access journal.en
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item from the UA Faculty Publications collection is made available by the University of Arizona with support from the University of Arizona Libraries. If you have questions, please contact us at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.en
dc.eprint.versionFinal published versionen
refterms.dateFOA2018-08-14T04:22:16Z
html.description.abstractThis paper describes a quick aphasia battery (QAB) that aims to provide a reliable and multidimensional assessment of language function in about a quarter of an hour, bridging the gap between comprehensive batteries that are time-consuming to administer, and rapid screening instruments that provide limited detail regarding individual profiles of deficits. The QAB is made up of eight subtests, each comprising sets of items that probe different language domains, vary in difficulty, and are scored with a graded system to maximize the informativeness of each item. From the eight subtests, eight summary measures are derived, which constitute a multidimensional profile of language function, quantifying strengths and weaknesses across core language domains. The QAB was administered to 28 individuals with acute stroke and aphasia, 25 individuals with acute stroke but no aphasia, 16 individuals with chronic post-stroke aphasia, and 14 healthy controls. The patients with chronic post-stroke aphasia were tested 3 times each and scored independently by 2 raters to establish test-retest and inter-rater reliability. The Western Aphasia Battery (WAB) was also administered to these patients to assess concurrent validity. We found that all QAB summary measures were sensitive to aphasic deficits in the two groups with aphasia. All measures showed good or excellent test-retest reliability (overall summary measure: intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) = 0.98), and excellent inter-rater reliability (overall summary measure: ICC = 0.99). Sensitivity and specificity for diagnosis of aphasia (relative to clinical impression) were 0.91 and 0.95 respectively. All QAB measures were highly correlated with corresponding WAB measures where available. Individual patients showed distinct profiles of spared and impaired function across different language domains. In sum, the QAB efficiently and reliably characterized individual profiles of language deficits.


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© 2018 Wilson et al. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License.
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as © 2018 Wilson et al. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License.